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Whole-genome association studies (WGAS) bring new computational, as well as analytic, challenges to researchers. Many existing genetic-analysis tools are not designed to handle such large data sets in a convenient manner and do not necessarily exploit the new opportunities that whole-genome data bring. To address these issues, we developed PLINK, an(More)
We describe the Phase II HapMap, which characterizes over 3.1 million human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 270 individuals from four geographically diverse populations and includes 25-35% of common SNP variation in the populations surveyed. The map is estimated to capture untyped common variation with an average maximum r2 of between(More)
With the advent of dense maps of human genetic variation, it is now possible to detect positive natural selection across the human genome. Here we report an analysis of over 3 million polymorphisms from the International HapMap Project Phase 2 (HapMap2). We used 'long-range haplotype' methods, which were developed to identify alleles segregating in a(More)
A map of 191 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) was built across a 5-Mb segment from chromosome 13q34 that has been genetically linked to schizophrenia. DNA from 213 schizophrenic patients and 241 normal individuals from Canada were genotyped with this marker set. Two 1,400- and 65-kb regions contained markers associated with the disease. Two markers(More)
Molecular genetic investigations of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have found associations with a variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) situated in the 3'-untranslated region of dopamine transporter gene (DAT1), a VNTR in exon 3 of dopamine receptor 4 gene (DRD4) and a microsatellite polymorphism located at 18.5 kb from the 5' end of(More)
The gene has been proposed as an attractive unit of analysis for association studies, but a simple yet valid, powerful, and sufficiently fast method of evaluating the statistical significance of all genes in large, genome-wide datasets has been lacking. Here we propose the use of an extended Simes test that integrates functional information and association(More)
Historically, association tests were limited to single variants, so that the allele was considered the basic unit for association testing. As marker density increases and indirect approaches are used to assess association through linkage disequilibrium, association is now frequently considered at the haplotypic level. We suggest that there are difficulties(More)
To identify colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility alleles, we conducted a genome-wide association study. In phase 1, we genotyped 550,163 tagSNPs in 940 familial colorectal tumor cases (627 CRC, 313 high-risk adenoma) and 965 controls. In phase 2, we genotyped 42,708 selected SNPs in 2,873 CRC cases and 2,871 controls. In phase 3, we evaluated 11 SNPs(More)
Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS) use commercial genotyping microarrays that can assay over a million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The number of SNPs is further boosted by advanced statistical genotype-imputation algorithms and large SNP databases for reference human populations. The testing of a huge number of SNPs needs to be taken(More)
STUDY DESIGN A cross-sectional population study of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. OBJECTIVE.: To examine the pattern and prevalence of lumbar spine MRI changes within a southern Chinese population and their relationship with back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Previous studies on MRI changes and back pain have used populations of asymptomatic(More)