Paavo Miettinen

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We consider a standard sequential decision to adopt/buy a good in a herding environment. The setup is same as in Sgroi (2002). Contrary to the basic herding case we introduce a cost that the agents have to pay for the information about their predecessors’ actions. All agents receive informative signals as in the standard herding models but do not view the(More)
In this paper we consider equilibrium behavior in a Dutch (descending price) auction when the bidders that are uninformed of their valuations with probability q and can acquire information about their valuation with a positive cost during the auction. We assume that the information acquisition activity is covert. We characterize the equilibrium behavior in(More)
The effects of long distance running training on blood parameters, hormone responses and bone growth were studied in young growing dogs. A genetically uniform group of female beagles matched with respect to age and body mass were used. The runner dogs (n=10) underwent gradually increased running exercise up to 40 km · day−1 on a treadmill with 15° uphill(More)
We characterize optimal strategies in a simple herding model where observations have a small cost. We assume that there are two states and two possible signals that each agent may get. The prior distribution is biased towards adopting behavior. That is, ex-ante, adopting gives a higher expected utility than not adopting. Contrary to Kultti & Miettinen(More)
We consider a voting situation where a society has to decide on the rule to use when choosing among two alternatives in the uncertain future. Our analysis is related to the set up of Barbera and Jackson (2001). While they consider ...nite societies in our set up the economy has an in...nite amount of agents. We de...ne a binary dominance relation over the(More)
We characterize optimal strategies in a simple herding model where observations have a small cost. We assume that there are two states and two possible signals that each agent may get. The prior distribution is biased towards adopting behavior. That is ex-ante adopting gives a higher expected utility than not adopting. Contrary to Kultti & Miettinen (2005)(More)
The effect of two different feeding regimes on energy metabolism and fertility was studied in dairy cows. The cows were divided according to the type of feed into a hay-urea and a silage group. Ketone body levels in blood were used as indicators of energy balance. Intake of dry matter and of energy was lower in the silage group than in the hay-urea group.(More)
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