• Publications
  • Influence
A quantitative study of worker reproduction in honey bee colonies
  • P. Visscher
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 1 October 1989
TLDR
The hypothesis of worker sterility enforced by other workers seems most likely to be correct, but further studies on these hypotheses are needed. Expand
Worker policing in the honeybee
TLDR
Experiments showing strong discrimination by honeybee (Apis mellifera) workers against worker-laid male eggs are described, supporting the worker-policing hypothesis. Expand
FORAGING STRATEGY OF HONEYBEE COLONIES IN A TEMPERATE DECIDUOUS FOREST
TLDR
Previous studies on the mechanisms of honeybee recruitment communication indicate that the foraging strategy of a honeybee colony involves surveying the food source patches within a vast area around its nest, pooling the reconnaissance of its many foragers, and using this information to focus its forager force on a few high-quality patches within its foraging area. Expand
Reproductive conflict in honey bees: a stalemate of worker egg-laying and policing
  • P. Visscher
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 24 October 1996
TLDR
Using electrophoretic markers, eggs laid by workers were identified in honey bee colonies with a queen, and these represented about 7% of the unfertilized (male) eggs laid in the colonies. Expand
Mass envenomations by honey bees and wasps.
TLDR
Despite different venom composition in the two insect groups, both may cause systemic damage and involve hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure and victim death may occur due to renal failure or cardiac complications. Expand
Stop Signals Provide Cross Inhibition in Collective Decision-Making by Honeybee Swarms
TLDR
It is shown that a key feature of a brain—cross inhibition between the evidence-accumulating populations—also exists in a swarm as it chooses its nesting site, and that cross inhibition between populations of scout bees increases the reliability of swarm decision-making by solving the problem of deadlock over equal sites. Expand
Group decision making in nest-site selection among social insects.
  • P. Visscher
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of entomology
  • 2007
The choice of a new nest site is ecologically critical for an insect colony. In swarm-founding social insects, or those that move as colonies from one site to another, this choice is one of theExpand
Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Implications for Honey Bee Health
TLDR
This study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. Expand
Survivorship of foraging honey bees
TLDR
Bees experienced a constant probability of death per unit time away from the colony, which leads to a log-linear survivorship curve of type II, which suggests that age-independent factors such as predation could play a strong role in selection of foraging range and other parameters. Expand
Lifetime learning by foraging honey bees
TLDR
The net rate of forage uptake by new foragers was low and gradually increased to approximately twice the initial rate after a week of foraging, which coincided with the median life span of the foragers. Expand
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