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New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree.
TLDR
Major changes in the topology of the parsimony tree are described and names for new and rearranged lineages within the tree following the rules presented by the Y Chromosome Consortium in 2002 are provided. Expand
The genetic legacy of Paleolithic Homo sapiens sapiens in extant Europeans: a Y chromosome perspective.
TLDR
A significant correlation between the NRY haplotype data and principal components based on 95 protein markers was observed, indicating the effectiveness of NRY binary polymorphisms in the characterization of human population composition and history. Expand
The phylogeography of Y chromosome binary haplotypes and the origins of modern human populations
TLDR
A set of unique event polymorphisms associated with the non‐recombining portion of the Y‐chromosome (NRY) addresses this issue by providing evidence concerning successful migrations originating from Africa, which can be interpreted as subsequent colonizations, differentiations and migrations overlaid upon previous population ranges. Expand
Y chromosome sequence variation and the history of human populations
Binary polymorphisms associated with the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome (NRY) preserve the paternal genetic legacy of our species that has persisted to the present, permittingExpand
The effective mutation rate at Y chromosome short tandem repeats, with application to human population-divergence time.
TLDR
This value is used to estimate the times of the African Bantu expansion, the divergence of Polynesian populations (the Maoris, Cook Islanders, and Samoans), and the origin of Gypsy populations from Bulgaria. Expand
Polarity and temporality of high-resolution y-chromosome distributions in India identify both indigenous and exogenous expansions and reveal minor genetic influence of Central Asian pastoralists.
TLDR
The reappraisal indicates that pre-Holocene and Holocene-era--not Indo-European--expansions have shaped the distinctive South Asian Y-chromosome landscape. Expand
Origin, diffusion, and differentiation of Y-chromosome haplogroups E and J: inferences on the neolithization of Europe and later migratory events in the Mediterranean area.
TLDR
The phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroups E and J was investigated in >2400 subjects from 29 populations, mainly from Europe and the Mediterranean area but also from Africa and Asia, revealing spatial patterns that are consistent with a Levantine/Anatolian dispersal route to southeastern Europe. Expand
Detection of numerous Y chromosome biallelic polymorphisms by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography.
TLDR
It is now possible to anticipate the inevitable detailed reconstruction of human Y chromosome genealogy based on several tens to even hundreds of these important polymorphisms. Expand
Excavating Y-chromosome haplotype strata in Anatolia
TLDR
This comprehensive characterization of Y-chromosome heritage addresses many multifaceted aspects of Anatolian prehistory, including: the most frequent haplogroup, J, splits into two sub-clades, one of which (J2) shows decreasing variances with increasing latitude, compatible with a northward expansion. Expand
The genetic heritage of the earliest settlers persists both in Indian tribal and caste populations.
TLDR
Results show that Indian tribal and caste populations derive largely from the same genetic heritage of Pleistocene southern and western Asians and have received limited gene flow from external regions since the Holocene. Expand
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