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Molecular evidence for glacial refugia of mountain plants in the European Alps
TLDR
A comparison of the phylogeographic patterns with geological and palaeoenvironmental data demonstrates that glacial refugia were located along the southwestern, southern, eastern and northern border of the Alps, which implies that evolutionary or biogeographic processes induced by climatic fluctuations act on gene and species diversity in a similar way.
Circumpolar phylogeography of Juncus biglumis (Juncaceae) inferred from AFLP fingerprints, cpDNA sequences, nuclear DNA content and chromosome numbers.
TLDR
It is suggested that the four subgroups diverged during isolation in different glacial refugia during the Quaternary, indicating that both areas were colonised at least twice and the different genome sizes and ploidy levels strongly suggest that the three main clades represent distinct gene pools and act as cryptic species.
Patterns of endemism and comparative phylogeography confirm palaeo- environmental evidence for Pleistocene refugia in the Eastern Alps
TLDR
Test hypotheses on Pleistocene refugia for mountain plants in the eastern part of the European Alps derived from palaeoenvironmental and geological results are tested, with new data on distributional patterns of vascular plant endemics and molecular phylogeographies of selected species.
Vicariance and dispersal in the alpine perennial Bupleurum stellatum L. (Apiaceae)
TLDR
This study shows that deep phylogeographic splits resulting from old vicariance events can be concealed by presently contiguous distribution areas, and can be related to glacial refugia in peripheral areas of the Alps that were recognised in previous studies.
Range-wide phylogeography of Juniperus thurifera L., a presumptive keystone species of western Mediterranean vegetation during cold stages of the Pleistocene.
TLDR
It is revealed that the Strait of Gibraltar acted as an efficient barrier against gene flow between the Moroccan and European populations for a very long time, and consequently support that the Moroccan populations should be recognised as a distinct subspecies (J.
Rare arctic‐alpine plants of the European Alps have different immigration histories: the snow bed species Minuartia biflora and Ranunculus pygmaeus
TLDR
Postglacial colonization of R. pygmaeus was accompanied by extreme founder events, with a single phenotype dominating all over the Alps and another, distantly related one dominating the North Atlantic area from Greenland over Svalbard to Scandinavia.
Genetic consequences of climate change for northern plants
TLDR
SDM combined with FST estimates and/or with species trait information thus allows the prediction of species' vulnerability to climate change, aiding rational prioritization of conservation efforts.
Central Asian origin of and strong genetic differentiation among populations of the rare and disjunct Carex atrofusca (Cyperaceae) in the Alps
TLDR
The alpine populations possibly originated due to immigration from Central Asia and the strong differentiation among them suggests that genetic drift has been strongly acting on the populations, either as a consequence of founder events during colonization or due to subsequent reduction of population sizes during warm stages of the Holocene.
History or ecology? Substrate type as a major driver of spatial genetic structure in Alpine plants.
TLDR
The relevance of particular ecological factors in shaping genetic patterns, which should be considered when modelling species projective distributions under climate change scenarios, are demonstrated.
Genetic diversity in widespread species is not congruent with species richness in alpine plant communities.
TLDR
This work tests whether the genetic and species levels of biodiversity co-vary, using a large-scale and multi-species approach and demonstrates that species richness and genetic diversity are not correlated.
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