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Ancient genomes reveal complex patterns of population movement, interaction, and replacement in sub-Saharan Africa
TLDR
The contraction of diverse, once contiguous hunter-gatherer populations in sub-Saharan Africa is demonstrated, and the resistance to interaction with incoming pastoralists of delayed-return foragers in aquatic environments is suggested.
Pleistocene rainforests: barriers or attractive environments for early human foragers?
Abstract In the 1980s, anthropologists argued that tropical rainforests were unattractive environments for long-term human navigation, subsistence and occupation. Meanwhile, archaeologists have
Tropical Forests in Prehistory, History, and Modernity
In popular discourse, tropical forests are synonymous with 'nature' and 'wilderness'; battlegrounds between apparently pristine floral, faunal, and human communities, and the unrelenting industrial
Language continuity despite population replacement in Remote Oceania
TLDR
Genome-wide data from ancient and modern individuals in Remote Oceania indicate population replacement but language continuity over the past 2,500 years, with Papuan migrations led to almost complete genetic replacement of in situ East Asian-derived populations, but not replacement of Austronesian languages.
Archaeological assessment reveals Earth’s early transformation through land use
TLDR
An empirical global assessment of land use from 10,000 years before the present (yr B.P.) to 1850 CE reveals a planet largely transformed by hunter-gatherers, farmers, and pastoralists by 3000 years ago, considerably earlier than the dates in the land-use reconstructions commonly used by Earth scientists.
78,000-year-old record of Middle and Later Stone Age innovation in an East African tropical forest
TLDR
A 78,000-year-long archeological record from Panga ya Saidi, a cave in the humid coastal forest of Kenya, shows gradual cultural and technological change in the Late Pleistocene.
The deep human prehistory of global tropical forests and its relevance for modern conservation.
TLDR
Significant archaeological evidence for the impacts of past hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists and urban settlements on global tropical forests is reviewed and the challenges faced by these groups are compared with those confronting present-day societies, which also rely on tropical forests for a variety of ecosystem services.
Direct evidence for human reliance on rainforest resources in late Pleistocene Sri Lanka
TLDR
Homo sapiens’ relationship with the tropical rainforests of South Asia is therefore long-standing, a conclusion that indicates the time-depth of anthropogenic reliance and influence on these habitats.
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