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An unusual supernova in the error box of the γ-ray burst of 25 April 1998
The discovery of afterglows associated with γ-ray bursts at X-ray, optical and radio wavelengths and the measurement of the redshifts of some of these events, has established that γ-ray bursts lie at
Supernova SN 2011fe from an exploding carbon–oxygen white dwarf star
TLDR
Early observations of type Ia supernova SN 2011fe in the galaxy M101 at a distance from Earth of 6.4 megaparsecs find that the exploding star was probably a carbon–oxygen white dwarf, and from the lack of an early shock it is concluded that the companion was likely a main-sequence star.
A Common Explosion Mechanism for Type Ia Supernovae
TLDR
A systematic spectral analysis of a large sample of well-observed type Ia supernovae finds that allsupernovae have low-velocity cores of stable iron-group elements and suggests that their progenitors had the same mass.
The Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae: Evidence for Systematics?
The photometric and spectroscopic properties of 26 well-observed Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) were analyzed with the aim of exploring SN Ia diversity. The sample includes (Branch) normal SNe, as well
Illuminating gravitational waves: A concordant picture of photons from a neutron star merger
TLDR
It is demonstrated that merging neutron stars are a long-sought production site forging heavy elements by r-process nucleosynthesis, which is dissimilar to classical short gamma-ray bursts with ultrarelativistic jets.
Supernova 2007bi as a pair-instability explosion
TLDR
Observations of supernova SN 2007bi are reported, a luminous, slowly evolving object located within a dwarf galaxy, and it is shown that >3 of radioactive 56Ni was synthesized during the explosion and that the observations are well fitted by models of pair-instability supernovae.
A hypernova model for the supernova associated with the γ-ray burst of 25 April 1998
The discovery of the unusual supernova SN1998bw, and its possible association with the γ-ray burst GRB 980425, provide new insights into the explosion mechanism of very massive stars and the origin
An optical supernova associated with the X-ray flash XRF 060218
TLDR
The data, combined with radio and X-ray observations, suggest that XRF 060218 is an intrinsically weak and soft event, rather than a classical GRB observed off-axis, which extends the GRB–supernova connection to X-rays flashes and fainter supernovae, implying a common origin.
A neutron-star-driven X-ray flash associated with supernova SN 2006aj
TLDR
The results indicate that the supernova–GRB connection extends to a much broader range of stellar masses than previously thought, possibly involving different physical mechanisms: a ‘collapsar’ for the more massive stars collapsing to a black hole, and magnetic activity of the nascent neutron star for the less massive stars.
Bolometric light curves and explosion parameters of 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae
Literature data are collated for 38 stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (SE SNe; i.e. SNe IIb, Ib, Ic and Ic-BL) that have good light curve coverage in more than one optical band. Using
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