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Lab Labor: What Can Labor Economists Learn from the Lab?
This chapter surveys the contributions of laboratory experiments to labor economics. We begin with a discussion of methodological issues: why (and when) is a lab experiment the best approach; how doExpand
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Leadership Skills and Wages
Controlling for cognitive skills, we find that men who occupied leadership positions in high school earn more as adults. The pure leadership‐wage effect varies, depending on definitions and timeExpand
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The Effects of Lottery Prizes on Winners and Their Neighbors: Evidence from the Dutch Postcode Lottery
Each week, the Dutch Postcode Lottery (PCL) randomly selects a postal code, and distributes cash and a new BMW to lottery participants in that code. We study the effects of these shocks on lotteryExpand
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Is Internet Job Search Still Ineffective?
While the Internet has been found to reduce trading frictions in a number of other markets, existing research has failed to detect such an effect in the labor market. In this paper, we replicate KuhnExpand
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Internet Job Search and Unemployment Durations
After decades of stability, the technologies used by workers to locate new jobs began to change rapidly with the diffusion of internet access in the late 1990’s. Which types of persons incorporatedExpand
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Does Pay Inequality Affect Worker Effort? Experimental Evidence
We study worker behavior in an efficiency‐wage environment in which coworkers’ wages can influence a worker’s effort. Theoretically, we show that an increase in workers’ responsiveness to coworkers’Expand
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The Expanding Workweek? Understanding Trends in Long Work Hours among U.S. Men, 1979–2006
According to U.S. Census and Current Population Survey (CPS) data, employed U.S. men are more likely to work more than 48 hours per week today than 25 years ago. Using 1979–2006 CPS data, we showExpand
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Where class size really matters: Class size and student ratings of instructor effectiveness
We examine the impact of class size on student evaluations of instructor performance using data on all economics classes offered at the University of California, Santa Barbara from Fall 1997 toExpand
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Job Search Methods: Internet versus Traditional
In the current “e-commerce” boom, much attention has been paid to how the Internet is transforming product markets. At the same time, the Internet also is transforming labor markets, altering the wayExpand
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Social security, longevity, and moral hazard
Abstract Recently, several authors have argued that social security can have positive effects on savings and welfare when individuals possess hidden information about their longevity, that is whenExpand
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