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Genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from western Siberia
We present the high-quality genome sequence of a ∼45,000-year-old modern human male from Siberia. This individual derives from a population that lived before—or simultaneously with—the separation of
Rise and Fall of the Beringian Steppe Bison
TLDR
A detailed genetic history of bison throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene epochs is reconstructed using ancient DNA and Bayesian techniques to reconstruct a large diverse population living throughout Beringia until around 37,000 years before the present, when the population's genetic diversity began to decline dramatically.
Pleistocene to Holocene extinction dynamics in giant deer and woolly mammoth
TLDR
It is shown that another spectacular megafaunal species, the giant deer or ‘Irish elk’, survived to around 6,900 radiocarbon yr bp (about 7,700 yr ago) in western Siberia—more than three millennia later than its previously accepted terminal date—and therefore, that the reasons for its ultimate demise are to be sought in Holocene not Pleistocene events.
Species-specific responses of Late Quaternary megafauna to climate and humans
TLDR
It is shown that climate has been a major driver of population change over the past 50,000 years, however, each species responds differently to the effects of climatic shifts, habitat redistribution and human encroachment.
Ancient DNA analyses exclude humans as the driving force behind late Pleistocene musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) population dynamics
TLDR
Musk ox population dynamics are better explained by a nonanthropogenic cause (for example, environmental change), a hypothesis supported by historic observations on the sensitivity of the species to both climatic warming and fluctuations.
Intraspecific phylogenetic analysis of Siberian woolly mammoths using complete mitochondrial genomes
TLDR
Five new complete mitochondrial DNA genomes of Siberian woolly mammoth are reported, sequenced with up to 73-fold coverage from DNA extracted from hair shaft material, demonstrating the existence of two apparently sympatric mtDNA clades that exhibit high interclade divergence.
Ancient DNA sequences point to a large loss of mitochondrial genetic diversity in the saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) since the Pleistocene
TLDR
Current genetic diversity of the saiga antelope is much lower than that present during the Pleistocene, an observation that data modelling using serial coalescent indicates cannot be explained by genetic drift in a population of constant size.
Southern montane populations did not contribute to the recolonization of West Siberian Plain by Siberian larch (Larix sibirica): a range‐wide analysis of cytoplasmic markers
TLDR
Interestingly, the main population expansion detected through Approximate Bayesian Computation in all four larch species investigated here pre‐dates the LGM, which suggests that the contribution of the high latitude cryptic refugia was geographically limited and that most of the current West Siberian Plain larch populations likely originated in the foothills of the Sayan Mountains.
Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing of Mitochondria from Ancient Hair Shafts
TLDR
The observed levels of damage-derived sequencing errors were lower than those observed in previously published frozen bone samples, even though one of the specimens was >50,000 14C years old and another had been stored for 200 years at room temperature.
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