• Publications
  • Influence
Mission-critical development with open source software: lessons learned
TLDR
We compiled our experiences developing SAP into a developer's guide for those considering using open source in their mission-critical application. Expand
  • 116
  • 5
  • PDF
malloc(3) Revisited
  • P. Kamp
  • Computer Science
  • USENIX Annual Technical Conference
  • 15 June 1998
TLDR
malloc (3) is one of the oldest parts of the C language environment and not surprisingly the world has changed a bit since it was first conceived. Expand
  • 29
  • 3
  • PDF
GBDE-GEOM Based Disk Encryption
  • P. Kamp
  • Computer Science
  • BSDCon
  • 8 September 2003
TLDR
The ever increasing mobility of computers has made protection of data on digital storage media an important requirement in a number of applications and situations. Expand
  • 12
  • 1
  • PDF
Timecounters: Efficient and precise timekeeping in SMP kernels.
TLDR
The FreeBSD timecounters are an architecture- independent implementation of a binary timescale using whateve rh ardware support is at hand for tracking time. Expand
  • 7
  • 1
  • PDF
The one-second war
  • P. Kamp
  • Computer Science
  • CACM
  • 1 May 2011
TLDR
Finding a lasting solution to the leap seconds problem has become increasingly urgent. Expand
  • 33
You're doing it wrong
  • P. Kamp
  • Computer Science
  • Commun. ACM
  • 1 June 2010
Think you've mastered the art of server performance? Think again.
  • 14
  • PDF
LinkedIn Password Leak: Salt Their Hide
  • P. Kamp
  • Computer Science
  • ACM Queue
  • 1 June 2012
TLDR
6.5 million unsalted SHA1 hashed LinkedIn passwords have appeared in the criminal underground. Expand
  • 25
Building Systems to Be Shared, Securely
TLDR
The history of computing has been characterized by continuous transformation resulting from the dramatic increases in performance and drops in price described by Moore's law. Expand
  • 15
HTTP/2.0 - The IETF is Phoning It In
  • P. Kamp
  • Computer Science
  • ACM Queue
  • 31 December 2014
TLDR
In the long run, the most memorable event of 1989 will probably be that Tim Berners-Lee hacked up the HTTP protocol and named the result the "World Wide Web." Tim’s HTTP protocol ran on 10Mbit/s, Ethernet, and coax cables, and his computer was a NeXT Cube with a 25-MHz clock frequency. Expand
  • 7
More Encryption Is Not the Solution
  • P. Kamp
  • Computer Science
  • ACM Queue
  • 1 July 2013
The recent exposure of the dragnet-style surveillance of Internet traffic has provoked a number of responses that are variations of the general formula, "More encryption is the solution." This is notExpand
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