• Publications
  • Influence
The Social Organisation of Antelope in Relation To Their Ecology
TLDR
The paper describes different feeding styles among antelope, in terms of selection of food items and coverage of home ranges, and argues that these feeding styles bear a relationship to maximum group size of feeding animals through the influence of dispersion ofFood items upon group cohesion. Expand
MATING SYSTEM AND SEXCUL DIMORPHISM IN LARGE TERRESTRIAL, MAMMALIAN HERBIVORES
Sexual dimorphism in mammals is not entirely satisfactorily explained by the models that are advanced to account for it among birds. This may be because species‐specific styles of being dimorphic,Expand
Life of Marsupials
Group size and activity in eastern grey kangaroos
  • P. Jarman
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
  • 1 August 1987
TLDR
Kangaroos in small groups were significantly more likely than those in large groups to stand upright when looking around, a posture interpreted as indicating more intense altertness. Expand
Social Behavior and Organization in the Macropodoidea
TLDR
The chapter describes sociality in the macropod first, considering which species are found in groups and how grouping is affected by environmental variables, and reviews the forms of social behavior. Expand
Conservation Management of Tasmanian Devils in the Context of an Emerging, Extinction-threatening Disease: Devil Facial Tumor Disease
TLDR
A metapopulation approach is needed that integrates captive and wild-living island and peninsula (disease suppression) populations to minimize the loss of genetic diversity over 50 years until either extinction and reintroduction can occur, resistance evolves or a field-deliverable vaccine is developed. Expand
Daily activity of impala
TLDR
The presence of females in his territory disturbs the basic activity pattern of the territorial male, reducing his time spent on feeding and ruminating and the relationship between the occurrence of males in shade and some environmental factors is analysed. Expand
Prey synchronize their vigilant behaviour with other group members
TLDR
The results confirmed that the proportion of time an individual spent in vigilance decreased with group size, but the time during which at least one individual in the group scanned the environment (collective vigilance) increased, and it was claimed that these waves are triggered by allelomimetic effects i.e. an individual copying its neighbour's behaviour. Expand
The Ecology of Feral Horses in Central Australia
Feral horses in central Australia spend most of their time foraging. There was no difference between nocturnal and diurnal time-budgets. However, horses were more likely to be seen walking to waterExpand
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