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The Bible, Protestantism, and the Rise of Natural Science
Acknowledgements Abbreviations Introduction 1. Worlds visible and invisible 2. Sensible signs and spoken words 3. The two reformations 4. Re-reading the two books 5. The purpose of nature 6. EdenExpand
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Subduing the Earth: Genesis 1, Early Modern Science, and the Exploitation of Nature
  • P. Harrison
  • Philosophy
  • The Journal of Religion
  • 1 January 1999
Dans cet article l'auteur etudie quelques-unes des facons dont les recits de la creation de la Genese furent utilises au Moyen Age et au debut de l'epoque moderne pour montrer que les racines deExpand
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Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England
From the patristic period to the beginning of the seventeenth century curiosity was regarded as an intellectual vice. Curious individuals were considered to be proud and "puffed up," and the objectsExpand
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Descartes On Animals
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Adam Smith and the History of the Invisible Hand
Few phrases in the history of ideas have attracted as much attention as Smith's "invisible hand," and there is a large body of secondary literature devoted to it. In spite of this there is noExpand
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'Religion' and the Religions in the English Enlightenment
Introduction 1. Antecedents 2. 'Religion', revelation, and the light of nature: Protestants and Platonists 3. The religious instinct and priestly corruptions: Lord Herbert and deism 4. Sacred historyExpand
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“Science” and “Religion”: Constructing the Boundaries
  • P. Harrison
  • Philosophy
  • The Journal of Religion
  • 1 January 2006
Over the past decade a number of historians of science have expressed strong reservations about whether their particular subject of interest actually has much of a history. Science, as the disciplineExpand
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The Bible and the emergence of modern science
The Bible played a significant role in the development of modern science. Most obviously, its contents were important because they could be read in ways that seemed either to conflict with or toExpand
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