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Evidence for GABAergic inhibitory deficits in major depressive disorder
A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study in Children With ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorder, OCD, and Matched Controls: Distinct and Non-Distinct White Matter Disruption and Dimensional Brain-Behavior
TLDR
D disruption in interhemispheric circuitry (i.e., fractional anisotropy alterations in the corpus callosum) is identified as a shared feature of ASD, ADHD, and OCD, however, fractionalAnisotography alterations may be more widespread and severe in ASD and ADHD than in OCD.
KETAMINE FOR TREATMENT‐RESISTANT UNIPOLAR AND BIPOLAR MAJOR DEPRESSION: CRITICAL REVIEW AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE
TLDR
This clinical review of ketamines will assess the evidence‐based use of ketamine and initial clinical implications of further development of a potentially novel treatment for rapid reduction of symptoms in depressed patients.
Functional Connectivity of Brain Structures Correlates with Treatment Outcome in Major Depressive Disorder
TLDR
Among 13 participants with 8 weeks follow-up data, connectivity measures in several regions, especially the subcallosal cortex, were highly correlated with treatment outcome, suggesting connectivity measures could provide a means to evaluate how likely a patient is to respond to an antidepressant treatment.
Evidence for increased glutamatergic cortical facilitation in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder.
TLDR
Findings suggest that major depressive disorder in children and adolescents is associated with increased intracortical facilitation and excessive glutamatergic activity.
Neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with atypical antipsychotics in pediatric patients: a review of published cases.
TLDR
Young patients can develop neuroleptic malignant syndrome during treatment with atypical antipsychotics, and clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion.
Insomnia moderates outcome of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor treatment in depressed youth.
TLDR
While adolescents reporting substantial insomnia were less likely to respond to antidepressant treatment than those without insomnia, children were more responsive to fluoxetine when they had insomnia.
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