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Avian Invasions: The Ecology and Evolution of Exotic Birds
TLDR
This book advances understanding of the invasion process while also exploring avian conservation biology, and basic principles of ecology and evolution.
Big brains, enhanced cognition, and response of birds to novel environments.
TLDR
It is confirmed that avian species with larger brains, relative to their body mass, tend to be more successful at establishing themselves in novel environments and provided evidence that larger brains help birds respond to novel conditions by enhancing their innovation propensity rather than indirectly through noncognitive mechanisms.
Avian Extinction and Mammalian Introductions on Oceanic Islands
TLDR
It is shown that the probability that a bird species has been extirpated from each of 220 oceanic islands is positively correlated with the number of exotic predatory mammal species established on those islands after European colonization and that the effect of these predators is greater on island endemic species.
The more you introduce the more you get: the role of colonization pressure and propagule pressure in invasion ecology
TLDR
It is argued that ‘propagule pressure’, a key term in invasion biology, has been attributed at least three distinct definitions, with the result that the distinct importance of these different concepts has been at best diluted, and at worst lost.
The Impact of United States Recreational Fisheries on Marine Fish Populations
http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/305/5692/1955 version of this article at: including high-resolution figures, can be found in the online Updated information and services,
Global patterns of introduction effort and establishment success in birds
TLDR
This work uses global data for more than 600 introduction events for birds to show that introduction effort is both the strongest correlate of introduction success, and correlated with a large number of variables previously thought to influence success.
Establishment of exotic parasites: the origins and characteristics of an avian malaria community in an isolated island avifauna.
TLDR
The results show that avian malaria parasites that successfully invaded are more globally generalist (both geographically widespread and with a broad taxonomic range of hosts) than AM parasites not co-introduced to New Zealand.
Influences on the transport and establishment of exotic bird species: an analysis of the parrots (Psittaciformes) of the world
TLDR
The availability of individuals for transport and release seems to be most important for passage through these stages, but has no obvious effect on establishment following release, and establishment success is higher for sedentary species, and species with broad diets.
Mistakes in the analysis of exotic species establishment: source pool designation and correlates of introduction success among parrots (Aves: Psittaciformes) of the world
Aim  To evaluate the effect of mis‐specifying the correct comparison of species pools in the study of species characteristics associated with the biological introduction of exotic species.
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