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Central cardiovascular effects of alpha adrenergic drugs: differences between catecholamines and imidazolines.
TLDR
The results suggest that alpha-2 selective catecholamines are not active in the nucleus reticularis lateralis region, whereas imidazolines induce a hypotensive effect whatever their affinity for one subtype of alpha adrenoceptors. Expand
The sympathetic nervous system and the metabolic syndrome.
TLDR
The behaviour of the sympathetic nervous system in the metabolic syndrome as well as the mechanisms potentially responsible for this neurogenic abnormality are examined. Expand
Murine models for pharmacological studies of the metabolic syndrome.
TLDR
This review presents the murine models of metabolic syndrome the most often used in pharmacological studies, and the most common metabolic syndrome models exhibit a non-functional leptin pathway, or metabolic disorders induced by high fat diets. Expand
Drugs acting on imidazoline receptors: a review of their pharmacology, their use in blood pressure control and their potential interest in cardioprotection.
TLDR
This review focuses on the main pharmacological and clinical properties of rilmenidine and moxonidine, paying particular attention not only to their efficacy in hypertension but also to other potential cardiovascular indications. Expand
Co-detection by two imidazoline receptor protein antisera of a novel 85 kilodalton protein.
TLDR
A possible candidate for the full-length imidazoline receptor(s) appears to be an 85 kDa protein, which was linearly correlated with reported I1 site radioligand Bmax values across nine rat tissues. Expand
Coupling of I(1) imidazoline receptors to the cAMP pathway: studies with a highly selective ligand, benazoline.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that alpha(2)R and I(1)R are definitely different entities because they are expressed independently in different cell lines, and both are both implicated in the cAMP pathway in cells (one is sensitive to pertussis toxin and the other is not). Expand
Chronic Treatment with Rilmenidine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Differences between Two Schedules of Administration
TLDR
Pharmacokinetic data show that the rapid plasma withdrawal of this drug may explain this particular feature in rats, and rilmenidine has only weak antihypertensive effects in conscious SHRs, even at doses higher than those that are active in rabbits and humans. Expand
Rilmenidine selectivity for imidazoline receptors in human brain.
TLDR
Rilmenidine, a new antihypertensive agent, appeared 2.5 and 3.5 times more selective than clonidine and guanfacine for medullary IPR sites than for cortical alpha-adrenoceptors, thus providing a possible explanation for the low sedative effects of this new molecule. Expand
Evidence for the involvement of imidazoline receptors in the central hypotensive effect of rilmenidine in the rabbit
TLDR
Rilmenidine exhibited in the rabbit a central hypotensive effect which originated in the same area as where clonidine acts, and specific imidazoline‐preferring receptors appear to be involved in this hypotensiveEffect. Expand
The imidazoline preferring receptor: binding studies in bovine, rat and human brainstem.
TLDR
The human NRL region provides the first model of an homogenous population of imidazoline-preferring, non-alpha-adrenergic membrane receptors and competition assays with idazoxan stereoisomers showed that this binding was stereospecific. Expand
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