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Increased rate of force development and neural drive of human skeletal muscle following resistance training.
TLDR
Increases in explosive muscle strength (contractile RFD and impulse) were observed after heavy-resistance strength training, which could be explained by an enhanced neural drive, as evidenced by marked increases in EMG signal amplitude and rate of EMG rise in the early phase of muscle contraction.
Neural adaptation to resistance training: changes in evoked V-wave and H-reflex responses.
TLDR
The present data suggest that the increase in motoneuronal output induced by resistance training may comprise both supraspinal and spinal adaptation mechanisms (i.e., increased central motor drive, elevated motoneuron excitability, reduced presynaptic inhibition).
A mechanism for increased contractile strength of human pennate muscle in response to strength training: changes in muscle architecture
TLDR
The present data suggest that the morphology, architecture and contractile capacity of human pennate muscle are interrelated, in vivo, and this interaction seems to include the specific adaptation responses evoked by intensive resistance training.
Rate of force development: physiological and methodological considerations
TLDR
Evidence-based practical recommendations are provided for rational quantification of rate of force development in both laboratory and clinical settings and various methodological considerations inherent to its evaluation are discussed.
Influence of maximal muscle strength and intrinsic muscle contractile properties on contractile rate of force development
TLDR
The main finding was that voluntary RFD became increasingly more dependent on MVC and less dependent on muscle twitch contractile properties as time from the onset of contraction increased.
A New Concept For Isokinetic Hamstring: Quadriceps Muscle Strength Ratio
TLDR
The functional hamstring:quadriceps ratio for fast knee extension yielded a 1:1 relationship, which increased with extended knee joint position, indicating a significant capacity of the hamstring muscles to provide dynamic knee joint stability in these conditions.
Training-Induced Changes in Neural Function
  • P. Aagaard
  • Biology, Psychology
    Exercise and sport sciences reviews
  • 1 April 2003
TLDR
Electromyography studies have indicated adaptation mechanisms that may contribute to an increased efferent neuronal outflow with training, including increases in maximal firing frequency, increased excitability and decreased presynaptic inhibition of spinal motor neurons, and downregulation of inhibitory pathways.
Neural inhibition during maximal eccentric and concentric quadriceps contraction: effects of resistance training.
TLDR
Quadriceps motoneuron activation was lower during maximal voluntary eccentric and slow concentric contractions compared with during fast concentric contraction in untrained subjects, and, after heavy resistance training, this inhibition in neuromuscular activation was reduced.
Load‐displacement properties of the human triceps surae aponeurosis in vivo
TLDR
The stiffness and Young's modulus exceeded those previously reported for the tibialis anterior tendon in vivo, but were similar to those obtained for various isolated mammalian and human tendons.
Myofibre damage in human skeletal muscle: effects of electrical stimulation versus voluntary contraction
TLDR
In human muscle, the delayed onset of muscle soreness was not significantly different between the two treatments despite marked differences in intramuscular histological markers, in particular myofibre proteins and satellite cell markers.
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