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OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine race and sex differences in cutaneous pain perception. METHODS Pain perception was measured using a suprathreshold evaluation of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness to a series of thermal stimuli in 27 whites (14 men and 13 women) and 24 African Americans (12 men and 12 women). Blood pressure,(More)
In a sample of 142 patients with positive treadmill test results, we found that African-Americans reported anginal pain during exercise at nearly twice the rate of Caucasians, and had a significantly shorter time to angina. The mechanisms for these race differences remain to be elucidated, but may include underlying physiologic responses, ethnocultural(More)
This study assessed the relation between hemodynamic data during a standardized mental stressor and ambulatory ischemia to determine if laboratory-induced responses could predict the magnitude of daily life ischemia. Forty-two men and 11 women, aged 46 to 79 years (mean 61), with coronary artery disease and exercise-induced ischemia were studied. All(More)
In order to determine the influence of resting systolic blood pressure and stable angina on cutaneous pain perception, we studied 19 male cardiac patients with stable angina and 16 male controls. Pain perception was measured using a suprathreshold evaluation of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness to a series of thermal stimuli. We found that men with(More)
We examined the relation between anginal symptoms and ischemic indexes during ischemia on exercise testing and daily activities in 76 patients (59 men and 17 women, mean age 61.5 years) with documented coronary artery disease and exercise-induced ischemia. All patients underwent upright bicycle exercise testing and 48-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic(More)
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