Otto Appenzeller

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1. To assess the effects of acute exposure to high altitude on baroreceptor function in man we evaluated the effects of baroreceptor activation on R-R interval and blood pressure control at high altitude. We measured the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components in R-R, non-invasive blood pressure and skin blood flow, and the effect of(More)
OBJECTIVE To assess the influence of different breathing patterns on autonomic cardiovascular modulation during acute exposure to altitude-induced hypoxia. DESIGN We measured relative changes in minute ventilation (VE), oxygen saturation (%SaO2), spectral analysis of RR interval and blood pressure, and response to stimulation of carotid baroreceptors(More)
OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that prolonged physical exercise induces long-lasting effects on blood pressure and heart rate we studied 17 endurance runners before and after the 1995 Sandia Wilderness Crossing Research Run (46 km of rocky trails, average altitude 2500 m). METHODS We evaluated the response of the cardiovascular system to sympathetic(More)
The hypoxic conditions at high altitudes present a challenge for survival, causing pressure for adaptation. Interestingly, many high-altitude denizens (particularly in the Andes) are maladapted, with a condition known as chronic mountain sickness (CMS) or Monge disease. To decode the genetic basis of this disease, we sequenced and compared the whole genomes(More)
AIM Interval hypoxic training was proposed as a technique for adapting hypoxia of various origins. Its effects on the hypoxic ventilatory response and on cardiovascular autonomic control are unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS We recorded ventilation, end-tidal oxygen (PETO2) and carbon dioxide partial pressures, RR interval and blood pressure during progressive(More)
BACKGROUND Leishmaniasis is an infectious disease endemic today in many areas of South America. METHODOLOGY We discovered morphologic and molecular evidence of ancient infections in 4 female skulls in the archaeological cemetery of Coyo Oriente, in the desert of San Pedro de Atacama, Northern Chile. The boney facial lesions visible in the skulls could(More)
Although human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type I is known to cause a number of diseases, there has been no convincing evidence of pathological changes after infection with the related virus, HTLV-II. We have found an endemic focus of HTLV-II infection among members of an American Indian population in New Mexico, USA. We set out to determine the(More)