Otavia L. Caballero

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Cancer/testis (CT) antigens, of which more than 40 have now been identified, are encoded by genes that are normally expressed only in the human germ line, but are also expressed in various tumour types, including melanoma, and carcinomas of the bladder, lung and liver. These immunogenic proteins are being vigorously pursued as targets for therapeutic cancer(More)
While genetic mutation is a hallmark of cancer, many cancers also acquire epigenetic alterations during tumorigenesis including aberrant DNA hypermethylation of tumor suppressors, as well as changes in chromatin modifications as caused by genetic mutations of the chromatin-modifying machinery. However, the extent of epigenetic alterations in cancer cells(More)
An autochthonous model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) permitted the analysis of why immunotherapy is ineffective in this human disease. Despite finding that PDA-bearing mice had cancer cell-specific CD8(+) T cells, the mice, like human patients with PDA, did not respond to two immunological checkpoint antagonists that promote the function of T(More)
We and others recently isolated a human p53 homologue (p40/p51/p63/p73L) and localized the gene to the distal long arm of chromosome 3. Here we sought to examine the role of p40/p73L, two variants lacking the N-terminal transactivation domain, in cancer. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed frequent amplification of this gene locus in(More)
Examination of human bladder, head and neck, and lung primary tumors revealed a high frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. The majority of these somatic mutations were homoplasmic in nature, indicating that the mutant mtDNA became dominant in tumor cells. The mutated mtDNA was readily detectable in paired bodily fluids from each type of cancer(More)
Cancer/testis (CT) antigens are protein antigens with normal expression restricted to adult testicular germ cells, and yet are aberrantly activated and expressed in a proportion of various types of human cancer. At least a subset of this group of antigens has been found to elicit spontaneous humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in cancer patients,(More)
We recently demonstrated the existence of specific patterns of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in several cancers. Here we sought to identify the presence of mtDNA mutations in prostate cancer and their paired PIN lesions. The D-loop region, 16S rRNA, and the NADH subunits of complex I were sequenced to identify mtDNA mutations in 16 matched PIN(More)
Cancer/Testis (CT) genes, normally expressed in germ line cells but also activated in a wide range of cancer types, often encode antigens that are immunogenic in cancer patients, and present potential for use as biomarkers and targets for immunotherapy. Using multiple in silico gene expression analysis technologies, including twice the number of expressed(More)
The potency of the immune response has still to be harnessed effectively to combat human cancers. However, the discovery of T-cell targets in melanomas and other tumors has raised the possibility that cancer vaccines can be used to induce a therapeutically effective immune response against cancer. The targets, cancer-testis (CT) antigens, are immunogenic(More)
Whereas genome sequencing defines the genetic potential of an organism, transcript sequencing defines the utilization of this potential and links the genome with most areas of biology. To exploit the information within the human genome in the fight against cancer, we have deposited some two million expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from human tumors and their(More)