Orion J. Buske

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Sequence census methods like ChIP-seq now produce an unprecedented amount of genome-anchored data. We have developed an integrative method to identify patterns from multiple experiments simultaneously while taking full advantage of high-resolution data, discovering joint patterns across different assay types. We apply this method to ENCODE chromatin data(More)
High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) promises to revolutionize our understanding of genes and their role in human disease by characterizing the RNA content of tissues and cells. The realization of this promise, however, is conditional on the development of effective computational methods for the identification and quantification of transcripts from(More)
There are few better examples of the need for data sharing than in the rare disease community, where patients, physicians, and researchers must search for "the needle in a haystack" to uncover rare, novel causes of disease within the genome. Impeding the pace of discovery has been the existence of many small siloed datasets within individual research or(More)
Exomiser is an application that prioritizes genes and variants in next-generation sequencing (NGS) projects for novel disease-gene discovery or differential diagnostics of Mendelian disease. Exomiser comprises a suite of algorithms for prioritizing exome sequences using random-walk analysis of protein interaction networks, clinical relevance and(More)
The discovery of disease-causing mutations typically requires confirmation of the variant or gene in multiple unrelated individuals, and a large number of rare genetic diseases remain unsolved due to difficulty identifying second families. To enable the secure sharing of case records by clinicians and rare disease scientists, we have developed the(More)
Deep phenotyping has been defined as the precise and comprehensive analysis of phenotypic abnormalities in which the individual components of the phenotype are observed and described. The three components of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO; www.human-phenotype-ontology.org) project are the phenotype vocabulary, disease-phenotype annotations and the(More)
PURPOSE Medical diagnosis and molecular or biochemical confirmation typically rely on the knowledge of the clinician. Although this is very difficult in extremely rare diseases, we hypothesized that the recording of patient phenotypes in Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms and computationally ranking putative disease-associated sequence variants improves(More)
Despite the increasing prevalence of clinical sequencing, the difficulty of identifying additional affected families is a key obstacle to solving many rare diseases. There may only be a handful of similar patients worldwide, and their data may be stored in diverse clinical and research databases. Computational methods are necessary to enable finding similar(More)
MOTIVATION The prioritization and identification of disease-causing mutations is one of the most significant challenges in medical genomics. Currently available methods address this problem for non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and variation in promoters/enhancers; however, recent research has implicated synonymous (silent) exonic mutations(More)
As genome-wide experiments and annotations become more prevalent, researchers increasingly require tools to help interpret data at this scale. Many functional genomics experiments involve partitioning the genome into labeled segments, such that segments sharing the same label exhibit one or more biochemical or functional traits. For example, a collection of(More)