Oriane Trouillard

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Dravet syndrome (DS) is a genetically determined epileptic encephalopathy mainly caused by de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene. Since 2003, we have performed molecular analyses in a large series of patients with DS, 27% of whom were negative for mutations or rearrangements in SCN1A. In order to identify new genes responsible for the disorder in the(More)
INTRODUCTION Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN1A gene are the main genetic cause of Dravet syndrome (previously called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy or SMEI). OBJECTIVE To characterise in more detail the mutation spectrum associated with Dravet syndrome. METHODS A large series of 333 patients was screened using both direct(More)
Mutations in PCDH19, encoding protocadherin 19 on chromosome X, cause familial epilepsy and mental retardation limited to females or Dravet-like syndrome. Heterozygous females are affected while hemizygous males are spared, this unusual mode of inheritance being probably due to a mechanism called cellular interference. To extend the mutational and clinical(More)
Chromosomal rearrangements are found in a subset of patients with autism. Duplications involving loci associated with behavioural disturbances constitute an especially good candidate mechanism. The Williams-Beuren critical region (WBCR), located at 7q11.23, is commonly deleted in Williams-Beuren microdeletion syndrome (WBS). However, only four patients with(More)
OBJECTIVE Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder in which three genes, CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A, are currently known to be involved. FHM is occasionally associated with other neurologic symptoms such as cerebellar ataxia or epileptic seizures. A unique eye phenotype of elicited repetitive daily blindness (ERDB) has also(More)
Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels contribute to cationic Ih current in neurons and regulate the excitability of neuronal networks. Studies in rat models have shown that the Hcn1 gene has a key role in epilepsy, but clinical evidence implicating HCN1 mutations in human epilepsy is lacking. We carried out exome sequencing for(More)
De novo mutations in the SCN1A gene, encoding the alpha1-subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1, are the most frequent genetic cause of Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy known so far. A few mutations inherited from an asymptomatic or mildly affected parent have been reported, suggesting that expression of the mutated gene may be(More)
BACKGROUND Mutations in SCN1A can cause genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+, inherited missense mutations) or Dravet syndrome (DS, de novo mutations of all types). Although the mutational spectra are distinct, these disorders share major features and 10% of DS patients have an inherited SCN1A mutation. OBJECTIVES AND PATIENTS 19 selected(More)
BACKGROUND Mutations in the leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) gene have been implicated in autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy. OBJECTIVE To describe the clinical and genetic findings in 2 families with autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy and the functional consequences of 2 novel mutations in LGI1. DESIGN Clinical, genetic,(More)
BACKGROUND Maternally derived duplications of the 15q11-q13 region are the most frequently reported chromosomal aberrations in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, caused by 15q11-q13 deletions or abnormal methylation of imprinted genes, are also associated with ASD. However, the prevalence of these disorders in ASD is(More)