Oliver F. Brandenberg

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Interference with virus entry is known to be the principle mechanism of HIV neutralization by antibodies, including 2F5 and 4E10, which bind to the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 envelope protein. However, to date, the precise molecular events underlying neutralization by MPER-specific antibodies remain incompletely understood. In this(More)
The HIV-1 envelope trimer adopts a quaternary conformation that effectively shields neutralization-sensitive domains and thus represents a major obstacle for natural and vaccine-elicited antibody responses. By using a structure-function analysis based on a specifically devised mathematical model, we demonstrate in this study that protection from(More)
HIV-1 enters target cells by virtue of envelope glycoprotein trimers that are incorporated at low density in the viral membrane. How many trimers are required to interact with target cell receptors to mediate virus entry, the HIV entry stoichiometry, still awaits clarification. Here, we provide estimates of the HIV entry stoichiometry utilizing a combined(More)
Variable loops 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 perform two key functions: ensuring envelope trimer entry competence and shielding against neutralizing antibodies. While preserving entry functionality would suggest a high need for V1V2 sequence optimization and conservation, shielding efficacy is known to depend on a high flexibility(More)
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