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Control-flow analysis of higher-order languages
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Control flow analysis in scheme
TLDR
This paper presents a flow analysis technique — control flow analysis — which is applicable to Scheme-like languages. Expand
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The Flux OSKit: a substrate for kernel and language research
TLDR
The Flux OSKit addresses this problem in a novel way by providing clean, well-documented OS components designed to be reused in a wide variety of other environments, rather than defining a new OS structure. Expand
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Control-flow analysis of higher-order languages of taming lambda
TLDR
Programs written in powerful, higher-order languages like Scheme, ML, and Common Lisp should run as fast as their FORTRAN and C counterparts. Expand
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Improving flow analyses via ΓCFA: abstract garbage collection and counting
TLDR
We present two independent and complementary improvements for flow-based analysis of higher-order languages: (1) abstract garbage collection and (2) abstract counting, collectively titled ΓCFA. Expand
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CFA2: A Context-Free Approach to Control-Flow Analysis
TLDR
We describe CFA2, the first flow analysis with precise call/return matching in the presence of higher-order functions and tail calls. Expand
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CFA2: a Context-Free Approach to Control-Flow Analysis
TLDR
We describe CFA2, the first flow analysis with precise call/return matching in the presence of higher-order functions and tail calls. Expand
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The semantics of Scheme control-flow analysis
TLDR
This is a follow-on to my 1988 PLDIpaper, “Control-Flow Analysis in Scheme” [9]. Expand
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Environment analysis via ΔCFA
TLDR
We describe a new program-analysis framework, based on CPS and procedure-string abstractions, that can handle critical analyses which the k-CFA framework cannot. Expand
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Pushdown flow analysis of first-class control
TLDR
We extend the CFA2 flow analysis to create the first pushdown flow analysis for languages with first-class control to allow continuations to escape to, and be restored from, the heap. Expand
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