Olga D. Chuquimia

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Macrophages and dendritic cells have been recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. However, more recently, other cells in the lungs such as alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) have been found to play important roles in the defense and pathogenesis of infection. In the present study we first compared AEC with pulmonary(More)
In this study, we have compared the immunological responses associated with early pulmonary mycobacterial infection in two mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6 known to exhibit distinct differences in susceptibility to infection with several pathogens. We infected mice via the intranasal route. We have demonstrated that BALB/c was less able to control(More)
Non-hematopoietic cells, including lung epithelial cells, influence host immune responses. By co-culturing primary alveolar epithelial cells and monocytes from naïve donor mice, we show that alveolar epithelial cells support monocyte survival and differentiation in vitro, suggesting a role for non-hematopoietic cells in monocyte differentiation during the(More)
Tissue-resident macrophages are heterogeneous with tissue-specific and niche-specific functions. Thus, simplified models of macrophage activation do not explain the extent of heterogeneity seen in vivo. We focus here on the respiratory tract and ask whether factors secreted by alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) can influence the functionality of resident(More)
The respiratory epithelium is a physical and functional barrier actively involved in the clearance of environmental agents. The alveolar compartment is lined with membranous pneumocytes, known as type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC I), and granular pneumocytes, type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II). AEC II are responsible for epithelial reparation(More)
In the present study, we addressed the question of whether Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-mediated innate immunity can contribute to the development of acquired immune responses. We immunized TLR2(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice three times subcutaneously with the mycobacterial antigen (Ag19kDa) (a TLR2 ligand) or Ag85A (not a TLR2 ligand). One week after the(More)
25 In the present study, we addressed the question whether the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)26 mediated innate immunity can contribute to the development of acquired immune responses. We 27 immunized TLR2 and wild-type (WT) mice three times subcutaneously with the mycobacterial 28 antigens 19kDa (TLR2 ligand) or Ag85A (not TLR2 ligand). One week after the(More)
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