Ole Johan Kemi

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BACKGROUND Individuals with the metabolic syndrome are 3 times more likely to die of heart disease than healthy counterparts. Exercise training reduces several of the symptoms of the syndrome, but the exercise intensity that yields the maximal beneficial adaptations is in dispute. We compared moderate and high exercise intensity with regard to variables(More)
OBJECTIVE Current guidelines are controversial regarding exercise intensity in cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation. Although high-intensity training induces larger increases in fitness and maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), moderate intensity is often recommended as equally effective. Controlled preclinical studies and randomized clinical trials are(More)
BACKGROUND In professional soccer, a significant amount of training time is used to improve players' aerobic capacity. However, it is not known whether soccer specific training fulfils the criterion of effective endurance training to improve maximal oxygen uptake, namely an exercise intensity of 90-95% of maximal heart rate in periods of three to eight(More)
AIMS The recent development of a rat model that closely resembles the metabolic syndrome allows to study the mechanisms of amelioration of the syndrome by exercise training. Here, we compared the effectiveness for reducing cardiovascular risk factors by exercise training programmes of different exercise intensities. METHODS AND RESULTS Metabolic syndrome(More)
Regular exercise training confers beneficial effects to the heart as well as to the entire body. This occurs partly because exercise training improves skeletal muscle work capacity and reduces resistance, thus increasing conductance in the peripheral circulation. More directly, exercise training also alters extrinsic modulation of the heart and improves the(More)
Regular exercise training is recognized as a powerful tool to improve work capacity, endothelial function and the cardiovascular risk profile in obesity, but it is unknown which of high-intensity aerobic exercise, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or strength training is the optimal mode of exercise. In the present study, a total of 40 subjects were(More)
Cardiac adaptation to aerobic exercise training includes improved cardiomyocyte contractility and calcium handling. Our objective was to determine whether cytosolic calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and its downstream targets are modulated by exercise training. A six-week aerobic interval training program by treadmill running increased maximal oxygen(More)
We hypothesized that high-intensity aerobic interval training results in a greater beneficial adaptation of the heart compared with that observed after low-to-moderate exercise intensity. This is supported by recent epidemiological, experimental, and clinical studies. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of myocardial adaptation to exercise training are(More)
OBJECTIVE Reduced activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase-2a (SERCA-2a) contributes to myocardial dysfunction. Exercise training improves myocardial Ca-handling, but SERCA-2a function is uncertain. We assessed SERCA-2a activity after exercise training. METHODS SERCA-2a function was assessed by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca uptake in cardiomyocytes(More)
Background—Individuals with the metabolic syndrome are 3 times more likely to die of heart disease than healthy counterparts. Exercise training reduces several of the symptoms of the syndrome, but the exercise intensity that yields the maximal beneficial adaptations is in dispute. We compared moderate and high exercise intensity with regard to variables(More)