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The genetic legacy of Paleolithic Homo sapiens sapiens in extant Europeans: a Y chromosome perspective.
TLDR
A significant correlation between the NRY haplotype data and principal components based on 95 protein markers was observed, indicating the effectiveness of NRY binary polymorphisms in the characterization of human population composition and history. Expand
Genetic evidence of an early exit of Homo sapiens sapiens from Africa through eastern Africa
TLDR
M is rendered the first genetic indicator for the hypothesized exit route from Africa through eastern Africa/western India, possibly the only successful early dispersal event of modern humans out of Africa. Expand
Origin, diffusion, and differentiation of Y-chromosome haplogroups E and J: inferences on the neolithization of Europe and later migratory events in the Mediterranean area.
TLDR
The phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroups E and J was investigated in >2400 subjects from 29 populations, mainly from Europe and the Mediterranean area but also from Africa and Asia, revealing spatial patterns that are consistent with a Levantine/Anatolian dispersal route to southeastern Europe. Expand
Single, Rapid Coastal Settlement of Asia Revealed by Analysis of Complete Mitochondrial Genomes
TLDR
It is shown that mitochondrial DNA variation in isolated “relict” populations in southeast Asia supports the view that there was only a single dispersal from Africa, most likely via a southern coastal route, through India and onward into southeast Asia and Australasia. Expand
Where west meets east: the complex mtDNA landscape of the southwest and Central Asian corridor.
TLDR
A number of deep-rooting lineages, whose relative clustering and coalescent ages suggest an autochthonous origin in the southwestern Asian corridor during the Pleistocene are observed. Expand
Excavating Y-chromosome haplotype strata in Anatolia
TLDR
This comprehensive characterization of Y-chromosome heritage addresses many multifaceted aspects of Anatolian prehistory, including: the most frequent haplogroup, J, splits into two sub-clades, one of which (J2) shows decreasing variances with increasing latitude, compatible with a northward expansion. Expand
The genetic legacy of Paleolithic Homo sapiens sapiens in extant Europeans: a Y chromosome perspective.
TLDR
A significant correlation between the NRY haplotype data and principal components based on 95 protein markers was observed, indicating the effectiveness of NRY binary polymorphisms in the characterization of human population composition and history. Expand
The mtDNA Legacy of the Levantine Early Upper Palaeolithic in Africa
TLDR
The early Upper Palaeolithic population(s) carrying M1 and U6 did not return to Africa along the southern coastal route of the “out of Africa” exit, but from the Mediterranean area; and the North African Dabban and European Aurignacian industries derived from a common Levantine source. Expand
Genomic insights into the origin of farming in the ancient Near East
We report genome-wide ancient DNA from 44 ancient Near Easterners ranging in time between ~12,000 and 1,400 bc, from Natufian hunter–gatherers to Bronze Age farmers. We show that the earliestExpand
The molecular dissection of mtDNA haplogroup H confirms that the Franco-Cantabrian glacial refuge was a major source for the European gene pool.
TLDR
Findings have major implications for the origin of Europeans, since they attest that the Franco-Cantabrian refuge area was indeed the source of late-glacial expansions of hunter-gatherers that repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe from ~15,000 years ago. Expand
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