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Prey synchronize their vigilant behaviour with other group members
TLDR
The results confirmed that the proportion of time an individual spent in vigilance decreased with group size, but the time during which at least one individual in the group scanned the environment (collective vigilance) increased, and it was claimed that these waves are triggered by allelomimetic effects i.e. an individual copying its neighbour's behaviour.
Individual variation in the relationship between vigilance and group size in eastern grey kangaroos
TLDR
The results suggest that only some prey individuals may gain anti-predator benefits by reducing their time spent scanning when in larger groups, and propose that some females exhibit higher levels of social vigilance than others, and that this social vigilance increases with group size, cancelling out any group-size effect on anti- predator vigilance for those females.
Group Dynamics and Landscape Features Constrain the Exploration of Herds in Fusion-Fission Societies: The Case of European Roe Deer
TLDR
This study investigates the winter movements of groups of free-ranging roe deer, in an agricultural landscape characterised by a mosaic of food and foodless patches, and provides empirical evidence that group cohesion can restrain movement and, therefore, the speed at which group members can explore their environment.
NEOTROPICAL XENARTHRANS: a data set of occurrence of xenarthran species in the Neotropics.
TLDR
The main objective with Neotropical Xenarthrans is to make occurrence and quantitative data available to facilitate more ecological research, particularly if the xenarthran data is integrated with other data sets of Neotropic Series that will become available very soon.
The effect of social facilitation on vigilance in the eastern gray kangaroo, Macropus giganteus
TLDR
The results show that the decision of an individual to exhibit a vigilant posture depended on what it and other group members had been doing at the preceding second and on group size, which increases the understanding of the much-studied relationship between vigilance and group size.
Vigilance and its complex synchrony in the red-necked pademelon, Thylogale thetis
TLDR
Some vigilance benefits may be obtained from the presence of conspecifics even in species that aggregate only temporarily on food patches without forming more permanent social groups, as in red-necked pademelons foraging at night in nonpersistent aggregations in a clearing in rain forest.
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