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C u r r e n t computer technol-q teners outside the person's close ogy offers severely physi-circle, however, it is extremely diffi-I ~ l b ~'~ cally impaired nonspeak-~ cult to accomplish such vital con-" ing people the potential to versational purposes as projecting "~l~" ' communicate by using a one's personality, acquiring a feel-b microcomputer or(More)
As world populations grow older the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementia related illnesses increases (approximately 18 million sufferers worldwide). One particularly devastating effect of AD is the loss of short-term memory, which radically impairs the sufferer's ability to communicate. People with dementia, however, often retain a(More)
ventive measures are found, designing computer systems to support people with dementia will remain a growing priority. The effects of dementia can be quite devastating for both the person with dementia and family members, as well as pose significant challenges to professional care-givers. Since effective participation in many social activities and(More)
The challenges faced by people who are severely physically impaired and nonspeaking are demonstrated by the fact that, even with current technology, the word rates that they can achieve using current communication systems tend to range from two to ten words per minute. Ways have been investigated in which prestored reusable texts might assist in improving(More)
This paper reports the development of a computer-aided conversation prosthesis which is designed for severely physically impaired non-speaking people. The research methodology was to model aspects of conversational structure derived from the field of conversation analysis within a prototype conversational prosthesis. The prototype was evaluated in empirical(More)