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Aquaporins, found in virtually all living organisms, are membrane-intrinsic proteins that form water-permeable complexes. The mammalian aquaporin AQP1 has also shown CO2 permeability when expressed heterologously in Xenopus oocytes, although whether this is a biochemical curiosity or of physiological significance is a matter of debate. Here we report that,(More)
Leaf-moving organs, remarkable for the rhythmic volume changes of their motor cells, served as a model system in which to study the regulation of membrane water fluxes. Two plasma membrane intrinsic protein homolog genes, SsAQP1 and SsAQP2, were cloned from these organs and characterized as aquaporins in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Osmotic water permeability(More)
Stomata, the microscopic pores on the surface of the aerial parts of plants, are bordered by two specialized cells, known as guard cells, which control the stomatal aperture according to endogenous and environmental signals. Like most movements occurring in plants, the opening and closing of stomata are based on hydraulic forces. During opening, the(More)
We demonstrate that membranes consisting of certain triblock-copolymers were tight for CO₂. Using a novel approach, we provide evidence for aquaporin facilitated CO₂ diffusion. Plant aquaporins obtained from heterologous expression were inserted into triblock copolymer membranes. These were employed to separate a chamber with a solution maintaining high CO₂(More)
Plasticity of ecophysiological acclimation determines habitat occupation of species of Clusia in an Atlantic rainforest of Brazil. Ecophysiological performance is not sufficient for explaining widespread versus locally restricted distribution of species among physiognomic sub-sites within the forest. Four species of Clusia were studied that have distinct(More)
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