Noömi Lombaert

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Occupational exposure to hard metal dust, consisting of tungsten carbide (WC) and metallic cobalt particles (Co), is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, while no increased risk was observed in workers exposed to Co alone. In vitro, in human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC), we previously demonstrated that WC-Co is more genotoxic(More)
Information on the toxicity of carbon nanotubes is still fragmentary but indicates that these particles can induce adverse effects. We previously demonstrated in rats that, when purified multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reach the lung, they are biopersistent and induce lung inflammation as well as fibrosis. The present study was designed to address the(More)
The objective of this state of the art paper is to review the mechanisms of induction, the fate, the methodology, the sensitivity/specificity and predictivity of two major cytogenetic endpoints applied for genotoxicity studies and biomonitoring purposes: chromosome aberrations and micronuclei. Chromosomal aberrations (CAs) are changes in normal chromosome(More)
Inhalation of hard metal dust (WC-Co particles) has been associated with an increased risk for lung cancer in occupational settings. In vitro, WC-Co was genotoxic in human lymphocytes producing DNA strand breaks and micronuclei. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo genotoxic effects of WC-Co dust in rat type II pneumocytes. DNA(More)
BACKGROUND With tobacco smoking, diet is the main source of cadmium (Cd) exposure in the general population. The carcinogenic and estrogenic activities of Cd make it a contaminant of potential concern for hormone-dependent cancers including breast cancer. Postmenopausal women represent the most appropriate population to investigate the possible impact of(More)
The present study aimed at comparing in vitro the apoptogenic properties of metallic cobalt (Co), tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) in conditions known to cause genotoxicity. Human peripheral blood mononucleated cells were incubated with 2.0-6.0 microg/ml of Co alone or mixed with WC particles and 33.3-100.0 microg/ml WC alone for up(More)
Hard-metals are made of tungsten carbide (WC) and metallic cobalt (Co) particles and are important industrial materials produced for their extreme hardness and high wear resistance properties. While occupational exposure to metallic Co alone is apparently not associated with an increased risk of cancer, the WC–Co particle mixture was shown to increase the(More)
Hard metals consist of tungsten carbide (WC) and metallic cobalt (Co) particles and are important industrial materials produced for their extreme hardness and high wear resistance properties. While occupational exposure to metallic Co alone is apparently not associated with an increased risk of cancer, the WC-Co particle mixture was shown to be carcinogenic(More)
CAS 1609 (compound 1) and CHF 2363 (compound 2) are two furoxan derivatives able to release nitric oxide (NO) under physiological conditions, and display typical NO-dependent vasodilator activity. The potential genotoxic effects of compound 1 and of the water-soluble analogue of CHF 2363 (compound 2a) were investigated. The results show that the two(More)
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