Learn More
Cell death is achieved by two fundamentally different mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Apoptosis is dependent on caspase activation, whereas the caspase-independent necrotic signaling pathway remains largely uncharacterized. We show here that Fas kills activated primary T cells efficiently in the absence of active caspases, which results in necrotic(More)
Members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family induce pleiotropic biological responses, including cell growth, differentiation, and even death. Here we describe a novel member of the TNF family, designated BAFF (for B cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family), which is expressed by T cells and dendritic cells. Human BAFF was mapped to(More)
Members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family induce pleiotropic biological responses, including cell growth, differentiation, and even death. Here we describe a novel member of the TNF family designated APRIL (for a proliferation-inducing ligand). Although transcripts of APRIL are of low abundance in normal tissues, high levels of mRNA are detected in(More)
BACKGROUND Activation of Fas (CD95) by its ligand (FasL) rapidly induces cell death through recruitment and activation of caspase-8 via the adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD). However, Fas signals do not always result in apoptosis but can also trigger a pathway that leads to proliferation. We investigated the level at which the two(More)
Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN, Lyell's syndrome) is a severe adverse drug reaction in which keratinocytes die and large sections of epidermis separate from the dermis. Keratinocytes normally express the death receptor Fas (CD95); those from TEN patients were found to express lytically active Fas ligand (FasL). Antibodies present in pooled human(More)
TRAIL induces apoptosis through two closely related receptors, TRAIL-R1 (DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (DR5). Here we show that TRAIL-R1 can associate with TRAIL-R2, suggesting that TRAIL may signal through heteroreceptor signaling complexes. Both TRAIL receptors bind the adaptor molecules FADD and TRADD, and both death signals are interrupted by a dominant negative(More)
Death receptors, such as Fas and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptors, recruit Fas-associated death domain and pro-caspase-8 homodimers, which are then autoproteolytically activated. Active caspase-8 is released into the cytoplasm, where it cleaves various proteins including pro-caspase-3, resulting in apoptosis. The cellular(More)
Recent studies suggest that trimerization of Fas is insufficient for apoptosis induction and indicate that super-aggregation of trimerized Fas might be prerequisite. For many cell surface receptors, cross-linking by multivalent ligands or antibodies induces their lateral segregation within the plasma membrane and co-localization into "caps" on one pole of(More)
Human Fas ligand (L) (CD95L) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha undergo metalloproteinase-mediated proteolytic processing in their extracellular domains resulting in the release of soluble trimeric ligands (soluble [s]FasL, sTNF-alpha) which, in the case of sFasL, is thought to be implicated in diseases such as hepatitis and AIDS. Here we show that the(More)