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Accounting For Horror: Post-Genocide Debates in Rwanda
Acknowledgements Abbreviations Introduction 1. 'Ethnicity': The Permeant Debate 2. The Pre-Cursor Debate 3. The Holocaust: The Comparative Debate 4. Debating Collective Guilt 5. Unresolved
'Illuminating the broader context': anthropological and historical knowledge at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
Historians and anthropologists have been among the experts called to enlighten non-Rwandan judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Given that the Tribunal's regulations provide
“We are not a Truth Commission”: fragmented narratives and the historical record at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
Legal practitioners at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) are exercised by the question of whether their endeavour should seek to intentionally create an “historical record.” Their
‘Invaders who have stolen the country’: The Hamitic Hypothesis, Race and the Rwandan Genocide
The use in genocidal propaganda of a modified ‘Hamitic Hypothesis’ (the assertion that African ‘civilisation’ was due to racially distinct Caucasoid invaders from the north/north-east of Africa) has
Genocide Never Sleeps
Accounts of international criminal courts have tended to consist of reflections on abstract legal texts, on judgements and trial transcripts. Genocide Never Sleeps, based on ethnographic research at
‘When we walk out; what was it all about?’: Views on “new beginnings” from within The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
The 1994 United Nations Security Council resolution which created the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) foresaw it marking a ‘new beginning’, both locally (peace and reconciliation in
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