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Although most higher plants establish a symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, symbiotic nitrogen fixation with rhizobia is a salient feature of legumes. Despite this host range difference, mycorrhizal and rhizobial invasion shares a common plant-specified genetic programme controlling the early host interaction. One feature distinguishing legumes is(More)
Most higher plant species can enter a root symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, in which plant carbon is traded for fungal phosphate. This is an ancient symbiosis, which has been detected in fossils of early land plants. In contrast, the nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses of plants with bacteria evolved more recently, and are phylogenetically(More)
Plants belonging to the legume family develop nitrogen-fixing root nodules in symbiosis with bacteria commonly known as rhizobia. The legume host encodes all of the functions necessary to build the specialized symbiotic organ, the nodule, but the process is elicited by the bacteria. Molecular communication initiates the interaction, and signals, usually(More)
The Hs1(pro-1) locus confers resistance to the beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schmidt), a major pest in the cultivation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The Hs1(pro-1) gene was cloned with the use of genome-specific satellite markers and chromosomal break-point analysis. Expression of the corresponding complementary DNA in a susceptible sugar(More)
Legume root nodules originate from differentiated cortical cells that reenter the cell cycle and form organ primordia. We show that perception of the phytohormone cytokinin is a key element in this switch. Mutation of a Lotus japonicus cytokinin receptor gene leads to spontaneous development of root nodules in the absence of rhizobia or rhizobial signal(More)
Nuclear-cytoplasmic partitioning and traffic between cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments are fundamental processes in eukaryotic cells. Nuclear pore complexes mediate transport of proteins, RNAs and ribonucleoprotein particles in and out of the nucleus. Here we present positional cloning of a plant nucleoporin gene, Nup133, essential for a symbiotic signal(More)
In legumes, root nodule organogenesis is activated in response to morphogenic lipochitin oligosaccharides that are synthesized by bacteria, commonly known as rhizobia. Successful symbiotic interaction results in the formation of highly specialized organs called root nodules, which provide a unique environment for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. In wild-type(More)
Most agriculturally important legumes fall within two sub-clades of the Papilionoid legumes: the Phaseoloids and Galegoids, which diverged about 50 Mya. The Phaseoloids are mostly tropical and include crops such as common bean and soybean. The Galegoids are mostly temperate and include clover, fava bean and the model legumes Lotus and Medicago (both with(More)
Lotus japonicus is a model plant for the legume family. To facilitate map-based cloning approaches and genome analysis, we performed an extensive characterization of the chromosome complement of the species. A detailed karyotype of L. japonicus Gifu was built and plasmid and BAC clones, corresponding to genetically mapped markers (see the accompanying(More)
A combined genetic and transcriptome analysis was performed to study the molecular basis of the arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) symbiosis. By testing the AM phenotype of nodulation-impaired mutants and complementation analysis, we defined seven Lotus japonicus common symbiosis genes (SYMRK, CASTOR, POLLUX, SYM3, SYM6, SYM15, and SYM24) that are required for both(More)