Nicolas Lartillot

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MOTIVATION A variety of probabilistic models describing the evolution of DNA or protein sequences have been proposed for phylogenetic reconstruction or for molecular dating. However, there still lacks a common implementation allowing one to freely combine these independent features, so as to test their ability to jointly improve phylogenetic and dating(More)
Most current models of sequence evolution assume that all sites of a protein evolve under the same substitution process, characterized by a 20 x 20 substitution matrix. Here, we propose to relax this assumption by developing a Bayesian mixture model that allows the amino-acid replacement pattern at different sites of a protein alignment to be described by(More)
In the Bayesian paradigm, a common method for comparing two models is to compute the Bayes factor, defined as the ratio of their respective marginal likelihoods. In recent phylogenetic works, the numerical evaluation of marginal likelihoods has often been performed using the harmonic mean estimation procedure. In the present article, we propose to employ(More)
Almost a decade ago, a new phylogeny of bilaterian animals was inferred from small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) that claimed the monophyly of two major groups of protostome animals: Ecdysozoa (e.g., arthropods, nematodes, onychophorans, and tardigrades) and Lophotrochozoa (e.g., annelids, molluscs, platyhelminths, brachiopods, and rotifers). However, it(More)
Several models have been proposed to relax the molecular clock in order to estimate divergence times. However, it is unclear which model has the best fit to real data and should therefore be used to perform molecular dating. In particular, we do not know whether rate autocorrelation should be considered or which prior on divergence times should be used. In(More)
Thanks to the large amount of signal contained in genome-wide sequence alignments, phylogenomic analyses are converging towards highly supported trees. However, high statistical support does not imply that the tree is accurate. Systematic errors, such as the Long Branch Attraction (LBA) artefact, can be misleading, in particular when the taxon sampling is(More)
Modeling across site variation of the substitution process is increasingly recognized as important for obtaining more accurate phylogenetic reconstructions. Both finite and infinite mixture models have been proposed and have been shown to significantly improve on classical single-matrix models. Compared with their finite counterparts, infinite mixtures have(More)
Inferring the relationships among Bilateria has been an active and controversial research area since Haeckel. The lack of a sufficient number of phylogenetically reliable characters was the main limitation of traditional phylogenies based on morphology. With the advent of molecular data, this problem has been replaced by another one, statistical(More)
DNA sequence analysis dictates new interpretation of phylogenic trees. Taxa that were once thought to represent successive grades of complexity at the base of the metazoan tree are being displaced to much higher positions inside the tree. This leaves no evolutionary "intermediates" and forces us to rethink the genesis of bilaterian complexity.
Genome-scale data sets result in an enhanced resolution of the phylogenetic inference by reducing stochastic errors. However, there is also an increase of systematic errors due to model violations, which can lead to erroneous phylogenies. Here, we explore the impact of systematic errors on the resolution of the eukaryotic phylogeny using a data set of 143(More)