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The past few years have seen intensive research efforts carried out in some apparently unrelated areas of dynamic systems – delay-tolerant networks, opportunistic-mobility networks, social networks – obtaining closely related insights. Indeed, the concepts discovered in these investigations can be viewed as parts of the same conceptual universe; and the(More)
Consider a set of n > 2 identical mobile computational entities in the plane, called robots, operating in Look-Compute-Move cycles, without any means of direct communication. The Gathering Problem is the primitive task of all entities gathering in finite time at a point not fixed in advance, without any external control. The problem has been extensively(More)
In this paper we study the problem of gathering in the same location of the plane a collection of identical oblivious mobile robots. Previous investigations have focused mostly on the unlimited visibility setting, where each robot can always see all the other ones, regardless of their distance. In the more difficult and realistic setting where the robots(More)
From an engineering point of view, the problem of coordinating a set of autonomous, mobile robots for the purpose of cooperatively performing a task has been studied extensively over the past decade. In contrast, in this paper we aim at an understanding of the fundamental algorithmic limitations on what a set of autonomous mobile robots can or cannot(More)
Delay-tolerant networks (DTNs) are characterized by a possible absence of end-to-end communication routes at any instant. In most cases, however, a form of connectivity can be established over time and space. This particularity leads to consider the relevance of a given route not only in terms of hops (topological length), but also in terms of time(More)
The gathering (or multi-agent rendezvous) problem requires a set of mobile agents, arbitrarily positioned at different nodes of the network to group within finite time at the same location, not fixed in advanced. The extensive existing literature on this problem shares the same fundamental assumption that the topological structure does not change during the(More)
We consider the problem of simulating traditional population protocols under weaker models of communication, which include one-way interactions (as opposed to two-way interactions) and omission faults (i.e., failure by an agent to read its partner's state during an interaction), which in turn may be detectable or undetectable. We focus on the impact of a(More)
Shape formation has been recently studied in distributed systems of programmable particles. In this paper we consider the shape recovery problem of restoring the shape when f of the n particles have crashed. We focus on the basic line shape, used as a tool for the construction of more complex configurations. We present a solution to the line recovery(More)