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Identity politics and the queering of art education: inclusion and the confessional route to salvation
In this article I discuss the relationship between theories of identity and making practices in secondary art and design. Of particular interest is the way students are invited to explore identitiesExpand
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Expressing the not-said: Art and design and the formation of sexual identities.
Central to this paper is an analysis of the work produced by a year 10 student in response to the „Expressive Study‟ of the art and design GCSE (AQA 2001). I begin by examining expressivism withinExpand
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Understanding Art Education: Engaging Reflexively with Practice
Introduction Part 1: Histories and Futures 1. Art and design in education: ruptures and continuities 2. A Return to Design in Art and Design: Developing creativity and innovation' Part 2:Expand
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The dirtying of David: transgression, affect, and the potential space of art
Transgression assumes the crossing of a boundary, a broken line which is either shored-up or redrawn in response; it thus marks an in-between state signalling danger, a pollution of the establishedExpand
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Learning to Teach Art and Design in the Secondary School : A Companion to School Experience
1. Contexts 2. Professional Development 3. Pupil Learning 4. Curriculum Planning 5. Resource Based Learning in Art and Design 6. Practice 7. Assessment 8. Issues in Craft and Design Education 9.Expand
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Conditions for Learning: Partnerships for Engaging Secondary Pupils with Contemporary Art
This article examines the findings of the London Cluster research, 'Critical Minds', in which the Institute of Education, University of London (IoE) worked in collaboration with Whitechapel ChapelExpand
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Issues in Art and Design Teaching
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The doll and pedagogic mediation: teaching children to fear the ‘other’
The present paper explores the ways in which non‐heteronormative sexual identities are represented and made to appear ‘other’ and potentially abject within North‐American and British pedagogicExpand
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