Nicholas A. Vavalle

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This study presents four validation cases of a mid-sized male (M50) full human body finite element model—two lateral sled tests at 6.7 m/s, one sled test at 8.9 m/s, and a lateral drop test. Model results were compared to transient force curves, peak force, chest compression, and number of fractures from the studies. For one of the 6.7 m/s impacts (flat(More)
OBJECTIVE Finite element (FE) computer models are an emerging tool to examine the thoracic response of the human body in the simulated environment. In this study, a recently developed human body model, the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) mid-sized male, was used to examine chestband contour deformations in a frontal and lateral impact. The(More)
OBJECTIVE Objective evaluation methods of time history signals are used to quantify how well simulated human body responses match experimental data. As the use of simulations grows in the field of biomechanics, there is a need to establish standard approaches for comparisons. There are 2 aims of this study. The first is to apply 3 objective evaluation(More)
Validation is a critical step in finite element model (FEM) development. This study focuses on the validation of the Global Human Body Models Consortium full body average male occupant FEM in five localized loading regimes—a chest impact, a shoulder impact, a thoracoabdominal impact, an abdominal impact, and a pelvic impact. Force and deflection outputs(More)
Human body finite element models (FEMs) are a valuable tool in the study of injury biomechanics. However, the traditional model development process can be time-consuming. Scaling and morphing an existing FEM is an attractive alternative for generating morphologically distinct models for further study. The objective of this work is to use a radial basis(More)
Computational modeling is an increasingly important tool in the study of injury biomechanics. This paper describes the development and validation of a seated human body finite element model as part of the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) project. The model was developed using LS-DYNA ® (LSTC, Livermore, CA) and is intended for blunt injury(More)
This paper has not been screened for accuracy nor refereed by any body of scientific peers and should not be referenced in the open literature. ABSTRACT This study describes the development and validation of a full human body finite element model created for use in crash injury biomechanics research as part of the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC)(More)
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