Nellie Y. Loh

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Dystrophin coordinates the assembly of a complex of structural and signaling proteins that are required for normal muscle function. A key component of the dystrophin protein complex is alpha-dystrobrevin, a dystrophin-associated protein whose absence results in neuromuscular junction defects and muscular dystrophy. To gain further insights into the role of(More)
The importance of dystrophin and its associated proteins in normal muscle function is now well established. Many of these proteins are expressed in nonmuscle tissues, particularly the brain. Here we describe the characterization of beta-dystrobrevin, a dystrophin-related protein that is abundantly expressed in brain and other tissues, but is not found in(More)
Dystrophin-related and associated proteins are important for the formation and maintenance of the mammalian neuromuscular junction. Initial studies in the electric organ of Torpedo californica showed that the dystrophin-related protein dystrobrevin (87K) co-purifies with the acetylcholine receptors and other postsynaptic proteins. Dystrobrevin is also a(More)
Mutations of the human CLCN5 gene, which encodes the CLC-5 Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger, lead to Dent's disease. Mutations result in functional defects that range from moderate reductions to complete loss of whole cell currents, although the severity of the functional defect rarely correlates with the severity of the disease. To further elucidate the basis of CLC-5(More)
Dystrophin is the key component in the assembly and maintenance of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DPC) in skeletal muscle. In kidney, dystroglycan, an integral component of the DPC, is involved in kidney epithelial morphogenesis, suggesting that the DPC is important in linking the extracellular matrix to the internal cytoskeleton of kidney(More)
BACKGROUND Dent's disease, a renal tubular disorder characterized by low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, and nephrolithiasis, is due to inactivating mutations in the X-linked renal-specific chloride channel, hCLC-5. The x-ray crystal structures of two bacterial chloride channels (CLCs) have recently been established, thereby allowing us to(More)
Renal tubular reabsorption is important for extracellular fluid homeostasis and much of this occurs via the receptor-mediated endocytic pathway. This pathway is disrupted in Dent's disease, an X-linked renal tubular disorder that is characterized by low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, and renal failure. Dent's disease is due(More)
Renal stone disease (nephrolithiasis) affects 3–5% of the population and is often associated with hypercalciuria. Hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis is a familial disorder in over 35% of patients and may occur as a monogenic disorder that is more likely to manifest itself in childhood. Studies of these monogenic forms of hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis in(More)
Renal stone disease (nephrolithiasis) affects 5% of adults and is often associated with hypercalciuria. Hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis is a familial disorder in more than 35% of patients, and may occur as a monogenic disorder, or as a polygenic trait involving 3 to 5 susceptibility loci in man and rat, respectively. Studies of monogenic forms of(More)
beta-Dystrobrevin is a dystrophin-related and -associated protein that is highly expressed in brain, kidney, and liver. Recent studies with the kidneys of the mdx3Cv mouse, which lacks all dystrophin isoforms, suggest that beta-dystrobrevin, and not the dystrophin isoforms, may be the key component in the assembly of complexes similar to the muscle(More)