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Hearing impairment is the most common sensory disorder, present in 1 of every 500 newborns. With 46 genes implicated in nonsyndromic hearing loss, it is also an extremely heterogeneous trait. Here, we categorize for the first time all mutations reported in nonsyndromic deafness genes, both worldwide and more specifically in Caucasians. The most frequent(More)
Hearing impairment (HI) affects 1 in 650 newborns, which makes it the most common congenital sensory impairment. Despite extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, mutations in one gene, GJB2, which encodes the connexin 26 protein and is involved in inner ear homeostasis, are found in up to 50% of patients with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.(More)
Otosclerosis is a common disorder of the otic capsule resulting in hearing impairment in 0.3–0.4% of the Caucasian population. The aetiology of the disease remains unclear. In most cases, otosclerosis can be considered as a complex disease. In some cases, the disease is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, sometimes with reduced penetrance. To date,(More)
Hearing loss is the most frequent sensorineural disorder affecting 1 in 1000 newborns. In more than half of these babies, the hearing loss is inherited. Hereditary hearing loss is a very heterogeneous trait with about 100 gene localizations and 44 gene identifications for non-syndromic hearing loss. Transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) has been(More)
BACKGROUND Usher syndrome (USH) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. The three recognised clinical phenotypes (types I, II and III; USH1, USH2 and USH3) are caused by mutations in nine different genes. USH2C is characterised by moderate to severe hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and normal vestibular function. One earlier report(More)
The role of myosins in the pathogenesis of hearing loss is well established: five genes encoding unconventional myosins and two genes encoding nonmuscle conventional myosins have so far been described to be essential for normal auditory function and mutations in these genes associated with hearing impairment. To better understand the role of this gene(More)
Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder, present in 1 of every 500 newborns. To date, 46 genes have been identified that cause nonsyndromic hearing loss, making it an extremely heterogeneous trait. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the inner ear function and expression pattern of these genes. In general, they are involved in hair(More)
Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder, affecting 1 in 650 newborns. Linkage analysis revealed linkage to locus DFNA22 in two Belgian families 1 and 2 with autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss. As MYO6 has previously been reported as responsible for the hearing loss at loci DFNA22 and DFNB37, respectively, DNA sequencing of the coding(More)
POU3F4 encodes a POU-domain transcription factor required for inner ear development. Defects in POU3F4 function are associated with X-linked deafness type 3 (DFN3). Multiple deletions affecting up to ~900-kb upstream of POU3F4 are found in DFN3 patients, suggesting the presence of essential POU3F4 enhancers in this region. Recently, an inner ear enhancer(More)
Hereditary hearing loss (HL) is a very heterogeneous trait, with 46 gene identifications for non-syndromic HL. Mutations in GJB2 cause up to half of all cases of severe-to-profound congenital autosomal recessive non-syndromic HL, with 35delG being the most frequent mutation in Caucasians. Although a genotype-phenotype correlation has been established for(More)