Neal R. Swerdlow

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Rationale: Patients with schizophrenia exhibit deficits in an operational measure of sensorimotor gating: prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle. Similar deficits in PPI are produced in rats by pharmacological or developmental manipulations. These experimentally induced PPI deficits in rats are clearly not animal models of schizophrenia per se, but appear to(More)
Rationale: Sensorimotor gating of the startle reflex can be assessed across species, using similar stimuli to elicit similar responses. Prepulse inhibition (PPI), a measure of sensorimotor gating, is reduced in patients with some neuropsychiatric disorders, and in rats after manipulations of limbic cortex, striatum, pallidum or pontine tegmentum ("CSPP"(More)
Rationale: Since the mid-1970s, cross-species translational studies of prepulse inhibition (PPI) have increased at an astounding pace as the value of this neurobiologically informative measure has been optimized. PPI occurs when a relatively weak sensory event (the prepulse) is presented 30–500 ms before a strong startle-inducing stimulus, and reduces the(More)
Psychiatric researchers need specific animal models to better understand the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Prepulse inhibition (PPI), the reduction in startle produced by a prepulse stimulus, is diminished in schizophrenic patients. Theoretically, deficient PPI in schizophrenic patients reflects a loss of sensorimotor gating that may lead to sensory(More)
Intense auditory stimuli elicit an involuntary startle response that is attenuated when the startling stimulus (the pulse) is preceded immediately by a low intensity stimulus (the prepulse). This phenomenon of prepulse inhibition (PPI) is utilized as a measure of sensorimotor gating and is significantly reduced in schizophrenic patients. Noncompetitive(More)
Certain animal models can greatly enhance our understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and can be used to predict the antipsychotic activity of compounds. Prepulse inhibition (PPI), the reduction in startle produced by a prepulse stimulus, is diminished in schizophrenia patients. Theoretically, deficient PPI in schizophrenia patients is a measure(More)
Sensorimotor gating of the startle reflex can be studied in humans and laboratory animals using measures of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex. PPI is reduced in patients with specific neuropsychiatric disorders and in rats after manipulation of the limbic cortex, striatum, pallidum or pontine tegmentum. Studies are rapidly identifying the(More)
Phencylidine (PCP) is a psychotomimetic noncompetitive glutamate antagonist that has been used in studies of the neural substrates of psychosis. Both schizophrenic patients and PCP-treated rats exhibit reduced amounts of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex, which is the normal inhibition of startle that occurs when the starting noise is preceded(More)
s, 13, 1455.<lb>Gabrieli, J. D. E., Keane, M. M., Stanger, B. Z., Kjelgaard, M. M., Growdon, J. H., & Corkin, S. (1994). Dissociations among perceptual-<lb>structural, lexical-semantic, and event-fact memory systems in<lb>amnesic, Alzheimer's, and normal subjects. Cortex, 30, 75-103.<lb>Gomez, R., & Schwaneveldt, R. W. (1994). What is learned from(More)
Neonatal excitotoxic hippocampal damage in the rat results in postpubertal onset of a variety of abnormal behaviors related to excessive dopaminergic transmission in the mesolimbic/nigrostriatal system, and thus may be considered an animal model of some aspects of schizophrenia. Because sensorimotor gating is impaired in adult patients with schizophrenia(More)