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When virtual teams need to establish trust at a distance, it is advantageous for them to use rich media to communicate. We studied the emergence of trust in a social dilemma game in four different communication situations: face-to-face, video, audio, and text chat. All three of the richer conditions were significant improvements over text chat. Video and(More)
Computer-mediated communication (CMC) is thought to be inadequate when one needs to establish trust. If, however, people meet before using CMC, they trust each other, trust being established through touch. Here we show that if participants do <i>not</i> meet beforehand but rather engage in various getting-acquainted activities over a network, trust is much(More)
Why are scientific collaborations so difficult to sustain? Inspired by the vision of Wil-liam Wulf (1989, 1993) and others, researchers over the last twenty-five years have made a number of large-scale attempts to build computer-supported scientific collaboration environments, often called collaboratories (National Research Council 1993). Yet only a few of(More)
In the past fifteen years, a great deal has been learned about the particular challenges of distant collaboration. Overall, we have learned that even when advanced technologies are available, distance still matters (Olson and Olson 2000). In addition, a recent seminal study of sixty-two projects sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) showed that(More)
Modern workplaces often bring together virtual teams where some members are collocated, and some participate remotely. We are using a simulation game to study collaborations of 10-person groups, with five collocated members and five isolates (simulated 'telecommuters'). Individual players in this game buy and sell 'shapes' from each other in order to form(More)
We studied the emergence of trust in a social dilemma game in four different communication situations: face-to-face, video, audio, and text chat. Three-person groups did 30 rounds of a social dilemma game and we measured trust by the extent to which they cooperated vs. competed. The face-to-face groups quickly achieved cooperative behavior, while the text(More)
Effective communication and coordination across multiple sites is extremely important for global software development. An experimental simulation that mimics an interdependent software division working across multiple locations was designed to study this phenomenon. Six experiments were run, each with participants divided into four or five sites depending(More)
Under what circumstances might a group member be better off as a long-distance participant rather than collocated? We ran a set of experiments to study how partially-distributed groups collaborate when skill sets are unequally distributed. Partially distributed groups are those where some collaborators work together in the same space (collocated) and some(More)
Computer-mediated communication (CMC) is thought to be inadequate when one needs to establish trust. Rocco [4] found, for example, that discussions about agreements conducted over email were far less successful in engendering trust than those conducted face-to-face. But, if the participants met and did a team building exercise before the real task, trust(More)
What do game designers know about sustaining learner engagement? This paper analyzed the popular simulation game SimCity with the goal of identifying design principles that would be useful for educators. The term ‘organic feedback’ is used to describe how SimCity gradually increases the complexity of its simulations and gives players a constant, pleasing(More)