Narek Pezeshkian

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The high-bandwidth digital radio link between a mobile robot and its remote control station degrades quickly as the robot penetrates the interior of a building or becomes shielded by intervening terrain. This paper describes a current project that uses mobile autonomous communication relay nodes to overcome this problem. Each node is a small slave robot(More)
We address the problem of maintaining a robust high-bandwidth RF communication link between a mobile robot and its remote control/monitoring station. The solution we are exploring uses a number of autonomous mobile relay nodes. These slave robots convoy behind the teleoperated or autonomous lead robot and automatically stop where needed to maintain an ad(More)
Tactical mobile robots used in military and lawenforcement operations normally require a robust, longrange, and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communications link to the remote control station. This is especially true for Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) operators using robots to defeat Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). Highfrequency digital radio(More)
Tactical mobile robots used in military and law enforcement operations normally require a robust, long range, and non-line-of-sight communications link to the remote control station. High frequency digital communications, which overcome problems encountered by tethered links and analog radios, are subject to line-ofsight (LOS) limitations. This is often(More)
The communication link between a tactical mobile robot and its control station is currently the Achilles’ heel of any ground robotic operation in the field. High-bandwidth digital radios, while providing the robot greater mobility than tethered links, perform mostly on lines of sight. The communication link degrades quickly as a robot penetrates the(More)
In the area of logistics, there currently is a capability gap between the one-ton Army robotic Multifunction Utility/Logistics and Equipment (MULE) vehicle and a soldier’s backpack. The Unmanned Systems Branch at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR Systems Center, or SSC), San Diego, with the assistance of a group of interns from nearby High Tech(More)
Intelligent behaviors allow a convoy of small indoor robots to perform high-level mission tasking. These behaviors include various implementations of map building, localization, obstacle avoidance, object recognition, and navigation. Several behaviors have been developed by SSC San Diego, with integration of other behaviors developed by opensource projects(More)
The ability to emplace stand-alone payloads in hostile territory has long been on the wish list of US warfighters. This type of activity is often conducted at great danger. We have developed a capability for automated payload placement from unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) using the Automatic Payload Deployment System (APDS) that can greatly reduce this(More)
The ability to precisely emplace stand-alone payloads in hostile territory has long been on the wish list of US warfighters. This type of activity is one of the main functions of special operation forces, often conducted at great danger. Such risk can be mitigated by transitioning the manual placement of payloads over to an automated placement mechanism by(More)