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Through their association with a kleisin subunit (Scc1), cohesin's Smc1 and Smc3 subunits are thought to form tripartite rings that mediate sister chromatid cohesion. Unlike the structure of Smc1/Smc3 and Smc1/Scc1 interfaces, that of Smc3/Scc1 is not known. Disconnection of this interface is thought to release cohesin from chromosomes in a process(More)
Sister chromatid cohesion conferred by entrapment of sister DNAs within a tripartite ring formed between cohesin's Scc1, Smc1, and Smc3 subunits is created during S and destroyed at anaphase through Scc1 cleavage by separase. Cohesin's association with chromosomes is controlled by opposing activities: loading by Scc2/4 complex and release by a(More)
Sequencing DNA fragments associated with proteins following in vivo cross-linking with formaldehyde (known as ChIP-seq) has been used extensively to describe the distribution of proteins across genomes. It is not widely appreciated that this method merely estimates a protein's distribution and cannot reveal changes in occupancy between samples. To do this,(More)
Cohesin stably holds together the sister chromatids from S phase until mitosis. To do so, cohesin must be protected against its cellular antagonist Wapl. Eco1 acetylates cohesin's Smc3 subunit, which locks together the sister DNAs. We used yeast genetics to dissect how Wapl drives cohesin from chromatin and identified mutants of cohesin that are impaired in(More)
Sister chromatid cohesion is mediated by cohesin, whose Smc1, Smc3, and kleisin (Scc1) subunits form a ring structure that entraps sister DNAs. The ring is opened either by separase, which cleaves Scc1 during anaphase, or by a releasing activity involving Wapl, Scc3, and Pds5, which bind to Scc1 and open its interface with Smc3. We present crystal(More)
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