Nancy M Bill

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This paper presents cost-outcome analyses of five injury prevention efforts in Native American jurisdictions: a safety-belt program, a streetlight project, a livestock control project, a drowning prevention program, and a suicide prevention and intervention program. Pre- and post-intervention data were analyzed to estimate projects' impact on injury(More)
OBJECTIVES We describe the burden of unintentional injury (UI) deaths among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations in the United States. METHODS National Death Index records for 1990 to 2009 were linked with Indian Health Service registration records to identify AI/AN deaths misclassified as non-AI/AN deaths. Most analyses were restricted(More)
BACKGROUND Navajo motor vehicle mortality is the highest among the 12 Indian Health Service (IHS) administrative areas. In July 1988, the Navajo Nation enacted a primary enforcement safety belt use and a child restraint law. OBJECTIVE Assess the impact of the laws on the rate and severity of pediatric (0-19 years) motor vehicle injury resulting in(More)
Throughout the world, injuries and violence are a leading cause of mortality and suffering among Indigenous communities. Among American Indian and Alaska Native children aged 1 to 19 years, 71% of deaths are from injuries. Motor-vehicle accidents, attempted suicide, and interpersonal violence are the most common causes of injuries in highly industrialized(More)
This paper presents cost-outcome analyses of four transportation injury prevention efforts in Native American jurisdictions. Pre- and post-intervention data were analyzed to estimate projects' impact on injury reduction. Projects' costs were amortized over the time period covered by the evaluation or over the useful life of physical capital invested.(More)
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