Learn More
The multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument is designed to provide global imagery at nine discrete viewing angles and four visible/near-infrared spectral bands. This paper describes an algorithm for the retrieval of leaf area index (LAI) and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) from atmospherically(More)
We use eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) from 21 FLUXNET sites (153 site-years of data) to investigate relationships between phenology and productivity (in terms of both NEP and gross ecosystem photosynthesis, GEP) in temperate and boreal forests. Results are used to evaluate the plausibility of four different conceptual(More)
[1] In the tropics and subtropics, most fires are set by humans for a wide range of purposes. The total amount of burned area and fire emissions reflects a complex interaction between climate, human activities, and ecosystem processes. Here we used satellite-derived data sets of active fire detections, burned area, precipitation, and the fraction of(More)
[1] We upscaled FLUXNET observations of carbon dioxide, water, and energy fluxes to the global scale using the machine learning technique, model tree ensembles (MTE). We trained MTE to predict site‐level gross primary productivity (GPP), terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), latent energy (LE), and sensible heat (H) based on(More)
The state-of-the-art on radiative transfer modeling in vegetation canopies and the application of such models to the interpretation and analysis of remotely sensed optical data is summarized. Modeling of top-of-the-atmosphere and top-of-the-canopy radiance field is developed as boundary value problems in radiative transfer. The parameterization of the(More)
Passive optical multiangle observations make possible the retrieval of scene structural characteristics that cannot be obtained with, or require fewer underlying assumptions than, single-angle sensors. Retrievable quantities include aerosol amount over a wide variety of surfaces (including bright targets); aerosol microphysical properties such as particle(More)
[1] The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative is a community-driven exercise to benchmark the models of radiation transfer (RT) used to represent the reflectance of terrestrial surfaces. Systematic model intercomparisons started in 1999 as a self-organized, open-access, voluntary activity of the RT modeling community. The results of the(More)
The community involved in modeling radiation transfer over terrestrial surfaces designed and implemented the first phase of a radiation transfer model intercomparison (RAMI) exercise. This paper discusses the rationale and motivation for this endeavor, presents the intercomparison protocol as well as the evaluation procedures, and describes the principal(More)