Nader M. Habashi

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OBJECTIVE To review the use of airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) in the treatment of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. DATA SOURCE Published animal studies, human studies, and review articles of APRV. DATA SUMMARY APRV has been successfully used in neonatal, pediatric, and adult forms of respiratory failure. Experimental(More)
BACKGROUND Adult respiratory distress syndrome is often refractory to treatment and develops after entering the health care system. This suggests an opportunity to prevent this syndrome before it develops. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that early application of airway pressure release ventilation in high-risk trauma patients reduces(More)
BACKGROUND Lung injury is often studied without consideration for pathologic changes in the chest wall. In order to reduce the incidence of lung injury using preemptive mechanical ventilation, it is important to recognize the influence of altered chest wall mechanics on disease pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesize that airway pressure release(More)
It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the(More)
Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) was first described in 1987 and defined as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with a brief release while allowing the patient to spontaneously breathe throughout the respiratory cycle. The current understanding of the optimal strategy to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury is to "open the lung and keep(More)
BACKGROUND Improperly set mechanical ventilation (MV) with normal lungs can advance lung injury and increase the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A key mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is an alteration in alveolar mechanics including alveolar instability or recruitment/derecruitment (R/D). We hypothesize that R/D(More)
Mechanical ventilation is a crucial component of the supportive care provided to patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Current practice stipulates the use of a low tidal volume (VT) of 6 ml/kg ideal body weight, the presumptive notion being that this limits overdistension of the tissues and thus reduces volutrauma. We have recently found,(More)
It has been shown that mechanical ventilation in patients with, or at high-risk for, the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be a double-edged sword. If the mechanical breath is improperly set, it can amplify the lung injury associated with ARDS, causing a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Conversely, the mechanical(More)