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Theory of the inhomogeneous electron gas
1. Origins-The Thomas-Fermi Theory.- 2. General Density Functional Theory.- 3. Density Oscillations in Nonuniform Systems.- 4. Applications of Density Functional Theory to Atoms, Molecules, andExpand
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Introduction To Liquid State Physics
Contents: Qualitative Description of Liquid Properties Excluded Volume, Free Volume and Hard Sphere Packing Thermodynamics, Equipartition of Energy and Some Scaling Properties Structure, Forces andExpand
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Electron density theory of atoms and molecules
This text describes experimental electron density determination in direct and momentum space and develops theories of electronic structure based on electron density with emphasis on systems with aExpand
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Electron Correlation in the Solid State
Many-body effects in jellium, M.P. Tosi solids with weak and strong electron correlations, P. Fulde ground and low-lying excited states of interacting electron systems - a survey and some criticalExpand
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Atomic dynamics in liquids
The subject of dynamics of electrons and atoms in liquids is presented in a form which should be useful for established research workers in the field of the physics and chemistry of the liquid state.Expand
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DENSITY MATRICES AND DENSITY FUNCTIONALS IN STRONG MAGNETIC FIELDS
The equation of motion for the first-order density matrix ~1DM! is constructed for interacting electrons moving under the influence of given external scalar and vector potentials. The 1DM is coupledExpand
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Momenta in Atoms using the Thomas-Fermi Method
The Thomas-Fermi statistical theory of the free atom is used to calculate the momentum distribution and the shape of the Compton profile for X-ray scattering, the results being expressed inExpand
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The relation between the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and the Thomas-Fermi approximations
It is shown that two essential approximations are made in using the customary Thomas-Fermi formula for the sum of the eigenvalues in any one-dimensional problem. The first is to start from theExpand
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