Muriel Moser

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Understanding the control exerted by cytokines on T helper cell subsets 1 and 2 (TH1-TH2) development has progressed to a fairly satisfying knowledge of intracellular signals and transcription factors. Less is understood about the molecular basis of TH1-TH2 development exerted by other parameters, such as how the antigen presenting cell can influence this(More)
The respiratory tract is continuously exposed to both innocuous airborne antigens and immunostimulatory molecules of microbial origin, such as LPS. At low concentrations, airborne LPS can induce a lung DC-driven Th2 cell response to harmless inhaled antigens, thereby promoting allergic asthma. However, only a small fraction of people exposed to(More)
Dendritic cells (DC) are described as "nature's adjuvant," since they have the capacity to sensitize T cells in vivo upon first encounter with the antigen. The potent accessory properties of DC appear to develop sequentially. In particular, the ability to process antigens and to sensitize native T cells develops in sequence, a process termed "maturation"(More)
Increasing evidence indicates that dendritic cells (DCs) are the antigen-presenting cells of the primary immune response. However, several reports suggest that B lymphocytes could be required for optimal T cell sensitization. We compared the immune responses of wild-type and B cell-deficient (muMT) mice, induced by antigen emulsified in adjuvant or pulsed(More)
Cells of the dendritic family display some unique properties that confer to them the capacity to sensitize naive T cells in vitro and in vivo. In the mouse, two subclasses of dendritic cells (DCs) have been described that differ by their CD8alpha expression and their localization in lymphoid organs. The physiologic function of both cell populations remains(More)
Cells of the dendritic family display some unique properties that confer to them the capacity to sensitize naive T cells in vitro and in vivo. In the mouse, two subclasses of dendritic cells (DCs) have been described that differ by their CD8 a expression and their localization in lymphoid organs. The physiologic function of both cell populations remains(More)
Recent evidence suggests that in addition to their well known stimulatory properties, dendritic cells (DCs) may play a major role in peripheral tolerance. It is still unclear whether a distinct subtype or activation status of DC exists that promotes the differentiation of suppressor rather than effector T cells from naive precursors. In this work, we tested(More)
Prior studies have shown that subclasses of dendritic cells (DC) direct the development of distinct Th populations in rodents and in humans. In the mouse, we have recently shown that administration of Ag-pulsed CD8alpha(-) DC induces a Th2-type response, whereas injection of CD8alpha(+) DC leads to Th1 differentiation. To define the DC-derived factors(More)
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are divided into three subtypes (alpha, beta or delta, and gamma) and are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis and in the control of inflammation. In this study, we analyzed the expression of PPARs in murine dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent(More)
The potent accessory properties of dendritic cells (DC) develop sequentially during a process termed "maturation." Splenic DC undergo functional maturation in vivo in response to the bacterial product LPS and migrate from the marginal zone to the T cell areas. The redistribution of fully mature DC, which present Ags encountered in the periphery, in the T(More)