Morten Emil Møldrup

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Consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with reduced risk of developing cancer, a phenomenon attributed to glucosinolates, which are characteristic of these vegetables. We report production of the bioactive benzylglucosinolate in the noncruciferous plant Nicotiana benthamiana through metabolic engineering. The study includes identification of(More)
The defense-related plant metabolites known as glucosinolates play important roles in agriculture, ecology, and human health. Despite an advanced biochemical understanding of the glucosinolate pathway, the source of the reduced sulfur atom in the core glucosinolate structure remains unknown. Recent evidence has pointed toward GSH, which would require(More)
To respond to the rapidly growing number of genes putatively involved in terpenoid metabolism, a robust high-throughput platform for functional testing is needed. An in planta expression system offers several advantages such as the capacity to produce correctly folded and active enzymes localized to the native compartments, unlike microbial or prokaryotic(More)
BACKGROUND Metabolic engineering in heterologous organisms is an attractive approach to achieve efficient production of valuable natural products. Glucosinolates represent a good example of such compounds as they are thought to be the cancer-preventive agents in cruciferous plants. We have recently demonstrated that it is feasible to engineer(More)
Glucosinolates are biologically active natural products characteristic of crucifers, including oilseed rape, cabbage vegetables and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Crucifer-specialist insect herbivores, like the economically important pest Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth), frequently use glucosinolates as oviposition stimuli. This suggests that(More)
The diverse biological roles of glucosinolates as plant defense metabolites and anticancer compounds have spurred a strong interest in their biosynthetic pathways. Since the completion of the Arabidopsis genome, functional genomics approaches have enabled significant progress on the elucidation of glucosinolate biosynthesis, although in planta validation of(More)
BACKGROUND Cyanogenic glucosides are common bioactive products that break down to release toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) when combined with specific β-glucosidases. In forage sorghum, high concentrations of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin lead to reduced productivity and sometimes death of grazing animals, especially in times of drought, when the dhurrin(More)
Fernando Geu-Flores,a,b,1,2 Morten Emil Møldrup,a,b,2 Christoph Böttcher,c Carl Erik Olsen,d Dierk Scheel,c and Barbara Ann Halkiera,b,3 a Section for Molecular Plant Biology, Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 1871 Frederiksberg, Denmark b Villum Kann Rasmussen Research Centre for Pro-Active(More)
Fernando Geu-Flores,a,b,1,2 Morten Emil Møldrup,a,b,2 Christoph Böttcher,c Carl Erik Olsen,d Dierk Scheel,c and Barbara Ann Halkiera,b,3 a Section for Molecular Plant Biology, Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 1871 Frederiksberg, Denmark b Villum Kann Rasmussen Research Centre for Pro-Active(More)