Morgan Lamy

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Hairs of the Thaumetopoea pityocampa caterpillar (Lepidoptera) cause a cutaneous reaction in man and animals. The irritating fraction extracted from hairs contains soluble proteins which were separated by various electrophoretic and immunoelectrophoretic techniques. Some of these proteins are present also in cuticle and haemolymph. One protein of 28,000(More)
The irritating fraction extracted from processionary caterpillar hairs contains soluble proteins which were separated by various electrophoretic and immuno-electrophoretic techniques. Some of these proteins are present also in cuticle and haemolymph. One protein of 28,000 daltons, formed of two subunits (13,000 and 15,000 daltons) is hair specific and(More)
Urticating hairs of pine processionary caterpillars are detectable in air using techniques designed for airborne microorganisms and pollen's research. As with pollens, abondance of hairs is correlated with distance of production zone and with local meterological conditions. Collected in Bordeaux, urticating hairs will be considered for allergists as pollens(More)
The urticating apparatus of the oak processionary caterpillar was studied by electron microscopy at times when this species was exceptionally abundant in France. Proteins of urticating hairs were studied by electrophoresis on acrylamide gel and were compared with thaumetopoein, an urticating protein of the pine processionary caterpillar, using immunological(More)
A scanning electron microscope study has enabled an explanation as to why the brown-tail moth provokes Lepidopterism. The brown-tail moth only provokes Lepidopterism via a transmission of the urticating hairs of its caterpillar. Urticating moths (genus Hylesia and Anaphae) protect their eggs and young caterpillars with urticating hairs, thus it is very(More)
Urticating hairs of the brown-tail moth (Euproctis chrysorrhoea L.) are detectable in the air using apparatus designed for the collection of airborne microorganisms and pollen research studies. The hairs are produced by caterpillars and are distributed by air currents or via moths. They were collected in Bordeaux. In the laboratory a nycthemeral cycle of(More)
The combination of a mechanical phenomenon (penetration of the hair) and a chemical phenomenon (discharge of a toxic substance) accounts for the pathological symptomatalogy induced by the processional pine caterpillar. Epidemiological study has pin-pointed the regions infested by the pine caterpillar and has described in detail the dermatitis inflicted by(More)